Voiding dysfunction: Definitions

David C. Chaikin, Jerry G. Blaivas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

'Lower urinary tract symptoms' is a term that describes symptoms related to both the storage and emptying phases of the micturition cycle. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency urgency, urge incontinence, nocturia, dysuria and other kinds of pain emanating from the bladder or urethra. Emptying symptoms consist of hesitancy, straining to void, difficulty starting, diminished stream, a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying and urinary retention. In both sexes, the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms is multifactorial, and symptoms are a poor indicator of underlying pathophysiology. In men, lower urinary tract symptoms are most often attributed to prostatic obstruction, but only approximately two-thirds of men with lower urinary tract symptoms meet the accepted diagnostic criteria for obstruction. Approximately half have detrusor overactivity and a smaller number have impaired detrusor contractility, sensory urgency, sphincteric incontinence, polyuria or nocturnal polyuria. In women, lower urinary tract symptoms are often considered to result from hormonal abnormalities, childbirth, aging, or previous surgery, but the multifactorial underlying pathophysiology is similar to that seen in men, except for a much lower incidence of urethral obstruction and a high incidence of sphincteric incontinence. Treatment typically begins with empiric, conservative therapies aimed at resolving detrusor instability or bladder outlet obstruction. However, although either or both of these etiologies may exist in the individual with lower urinary tract symptoms, treatment may fail as a result of another cause. We believe that treatment based on the pathophysiology of the symptoms will lead to better outcomes than treatment based on symptoms alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-398
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Urology
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Polyuria
Urinary Bladder
Urethral Obstruction
Nocturia
Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction
Urge Urinary Incontinence
Dysuria
Urinary Retention
Urination
Incidence
Urethra
Emotions
Therapeutics
Parturition
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Chaikin, David C. ; Blaivas, Jerry G. / Voiding dysfunction : Definitions. In: Current Opinion in Urology. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 395-398.
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Voiding dysfunction : Definitions. / Chaikin, David C.; Blaivas, Jerry G.

In: Current Opinion in Urology, Vol. 11, No. 4, 11.07.2001, p. 395-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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