Venographic surveillance of tunneled venous access devices in adult oncology patients

McDonald K. Horne, Donna Jo May, H. Richard Alexander, Elizabeth P. Steinhaus, Eric Whitman, Richard C. Chang, John L. Doppman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Tunneled venous access devices (VADs) are often essential in the care of patients with advanced malignancies, but they carry an uncertain risk of thrombosis. Methods: To determine the incidence of venoocclusion related to silicone VADs in a population of adult oncology patients, we prospectively studied 50 individuals with upper extremity venograms ∼6 weeks after their VADs had been implanted. Twenty-one of these patients were reevaluated with venograms ∼12 weeks after catheterization. In addition, venograms were performed on a separate group of 24 patients who needed catheterization of axillary-subclavian veins that had been catheterized in the past. Results: The 6-week venograms in the prospective study showed partial venous obstruction in 15 patients (30%), whereas three (6%) had developed symptomatic total venoocclusion by this time. The 12-week venograms showed two additional complete occlusions. Venograms of 30 previously catheterized veins showed complete venoocclusion in nine (30%), although only two had a history of thrombosis. Conclusions: Our observations indicate that VADs frequently cause partial venoocclusion within the first 6 weeks of catheterization and that permanent venous damage from VADs is common, even without a history of VAD-related thrombosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-178
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Equipment and Supplies
Catheterization
Thrombosis
Axillary Vein
Subclavian Vein
Silicones
Upper Extremity
Veins
Patient Care
Prospective Studies
Incidence
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Horne, M. K., May, D. J., Alexander, H. R., Steinhaus, E. P., Whitman, E., Chang, R. C., & Doppman, J. L. (1995). Venographic surveillance of tunneled venous access devices in adult oncology patients. Annals of Surgical Oncology, 2(2), 174-178. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02303635
Horne, McDonald K. ; May, Donna Jo ; Alexander, H. Richard ; Steinhaus, Elizabeth P. ; Whitman, Eric ; Chang, Richard C. ; Doppman, John L. / Venographic surveillance of tunneled venous access devices in adult oncology patients. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 1995 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 174-178.
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abstract = "Background: Tunneled venous access devices (VADs) are often essential in the care of patients with advanced malignancies, but they carry an uncertain risk of thrombosis. Methods: To determine the incidence of venoocclusion related to silicone VADs in a population of adult oncology patients, we prospectively studied 50 individuals with upper extremity venograms ∼6 weeks after their VADs had been implanted. Twenty-one of these patients were reevaluated with venograms ∼12 weeks after catheterization. In addition, venograms were performed on a separate group of 24 patients who needed catheterization of axillary-subclavian veins that had been catheterized in the past. Results: The 6-week venograms in the prospective study showed partial venous obstruction in 15 patients (30{\%}), whereas three (6{\%}) had developed symptomatic total venoocclusion by this time. The 12-week venograms showed two additional complete occlusions. Venograms of 30 previously catheterized veins showed complete venoocclusion in nine (30{\%}), although only two had a history of thrombosis. Conclusions: Our observations indicate that VADs frequently cause partial venoocclusion within the first 6 weeks of catheterization and that permanent venous damage from VADs is common, even without a history of VAD-related thrombosis.",
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Horne, MK, May, DJ, Alexander, HR, Steinhaus, EP, Whitman, E, Chang, RC & Doppman, JL 1995, 'Venographic surveillance of tunneled venous access devices in adult oncology patients', Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 174-178. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02303635

Venographic surveillance of tunneled venous access devices in adult oncology patients. / Horne, McDonald K.; May, Donna Jo; Alexander, H. Richard; Steinhaus, Elizabeth P.; Whitman, Eric; Chang, Richard C.; Doppman, John L.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.03.1995, p. 174-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Horne, McDonald K.

AU - May, Donna Jo

AU - Alexander, H. Richard

AU - Steinhaus, Elizabeth P.

AU - Whitman, Eric

AU - Chang, Richard C.

AU - Doppman, John L.

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N2 - Background: Tunneled venous access devices (VADs) are often essential in the care of patients with advanced malignancies, but they carry an uncertain risk of thrombosis. Methods: To determine the incidence of venoocclusion related to silicone VADs in a population of adult oncology patients, we prospectively studied 50 individuals with upper extremity venograms ∼6 weeks after their VADs had been implanted. Twenty-one of these patients were reevaluated with venograms ∼12 weeks after catheterization. In addition, venograms were performed on a separate group of 24 patients who needed catheterization of axillary-subclavian veins that had been catheterized in the past. Results: The 6-week venograms in the prospective study showed partial venous obstruction in 15 patients (30%), whereas three (6%) had developed symptomatic total venoocclusion by this time. The 12-week venograms showed two additional complete occlusions. Venograms of 30 previously catheterized veins showed complete venoocclusion in nine (30%), although only two had a history of thrombosis. Conclusions: Our observations indicate that VADs frequently cause partial venoocclusion within the first 6 weeks of catheterization and that permanent venous damage from VADs is common, even without a history of VAD-related thrombosis.

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