Use of biologic agents in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review Owing to its aggressive clinical course and associated immunologic abnormalities, pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasingly managed with immunomodulators and biologic agents. Clinical experience with therapy targeted against tumor necrosis factor-alpha has raised important questions about these agents, which will be addressed in this review. Recent findings Pediatric IBD is increasingly appreciated to have a variety of recognized clinical phenotypes that are associated with particular genotypes and serologic responses. These observations may ultimately allow individualized therapy that could change the natural history of pediatric IBD and reverse its severe metabolic and growth effects. Several new studies suggest that antitumor necrosis factor therapy could be an important part of this therapeutic vista. In addition to shedding light on who could best benefit from such agents, optimization of such therapy and its safety have been active areas of recent research. Summary Biologic therapy for pediatric IBD is an increasingly employed strategy. The aggressive nature of the disease and its consequent metabolic effects make this an attractive option for many patients. Recent research is helping guide the clinician to identify who could best benefit from such therapy while also exploring its safety and ideal dosing strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-650
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Biological Factors
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Pediatrics
Therapeutics
Safety
Biological Therapy
Immunologic Factors
Research
Necrosis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Genotype
Phenotype
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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Use of biologic agents in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. / Rosh, Joel R.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.10.2009, p. 646-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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