Tube Feeding-Related Diarrhea in Acutely III Patients

Peggi A. Guenter, R. Gregg Settle, Shelley Perlmutter, Paul L. Marino, Gary A. Desimone, Rolando Rolandelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acutely ill patients received tube feeding for an average of 15.8 days and, on average, 35% of those days were spent in the intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were prospectively assigned either a fiber-free formula (FFF-OSMOLITE HN, Ross; n=50) or a fiber-supplemented (soy polysaccharide 14.4 g/L) formula (FSF=JEVITY, Ross; n=50). Diarrhea was defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day and occurred in 30% of all patients. Diarrhea developed in 29 (41%) of the 71 patients who received antibiotics during, or within 2 weeks prior to, the feeding period, whereas only 1 (3%) of the 29 patients not receiving antibiotics developed diarrhea (p < 0.005); and this patient developed diarrhea on the day of death. Among the 30 patients with diarrhea, stool Clostridium difficile (CD) toxin was positive in 15 (50%), negative in 11 (37%), and was not measured in four. The mean serum albumin was significantly lower in patients with diarrhea (2.43) than in those without diarrhea (2.75) (p = 0.043). There were no significant differences in age, sex, diagnoses, number of feeding days, and percent ICU days between patients with and without diarrhea. While not statistically significant, patients who received FSF were observed to have a lower incidence of diarrhea, a lower percentage of diarrhea days per total feeding days, and a lower frequency of positive CD toxin assays than patients who received FFF. In this patient population, antibiotic usage was the factor most strongly associated with diarrhea during tube feedings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-280
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

tube feeding
Enteral Nutrition
Diarrhea
diarrhea
Clostridium difficile
antibiotics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Intensive Care Units
toxins
serum albumin
Serum Albumin
Polysaccharides
polysaccharides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Guenter, P. A., Settle, R. G., Perlmutter, S., Marino, P. L., Desimone, G. A., & Rolandelli, R. (1991). Tube Feeding-Related Diarrhea in Acutely III Patients. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 15(3), 277-280. https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607191015003277
Guenter, Peggi A. ; Settle, R. Gregg ; Perlmutter, Shelley ; Marino, Paul L. ; Desimone, Gary A. ; Rolandelli, Rolando. / Tube Feeding-Related Diarrhea in Acutely III Patients. In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 1991 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 277-280.
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Guenter, PA, Settle, RG, Perlmutter, S, Marino, PL, Desimone, GA & Rolandelli, R 1991, 'Tube Feeding-Related Diarrhea in Acutely III Patients', Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 277-280. https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607191015003277

Tube Feeding-Related Diarrhea in Acutely III Patients. / Guenter, Peggi A.; Settle, R. Gregg; Perlmutter, Shelley; Marino, Paul L.; Desimone, Gary A.; Rolandelli, Rolando.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 277-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Guenter, Peggi A.

AU - Settle, R. Gregg

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