Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood With Cognitive Behavioral Strategies

Nader N. Youssef, Joel Rosh, Mary Loughran, Stephanie G. Schuckalo, Ann N. Cotter, Barbara G. Verga, Richard L. Mones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral approach to the treatment of recurrent abdominal pain caused by childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). From September 2001 to December 2002, 18 patients (12 male; mean age, 12.1 ± 4.9 years) with chronic abdominal pain (mean duration, 11.8 ± 13.3 months) caused by FGIDs were referred to our facility’s mind-body institute (MBI). Treatment included guided imagery and progressive relaxation techniques. The mean number of sessions per patient was 4.3 ± 3.4. Outcomes included change in abdominal pain and quality of life, evaluated by the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL®). Follow-up was 10.6 ± 2.3 months after the last MBI session. Abdominal pain improved in 89% of patients; weekly pain episodes decreased from 5.5 ± 0.9 to 2.0 ± 2.7 (P < 0.05); pain intensity (0 to 3 scale) decreased from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 0.6 ± 0.7 (P < 0.04); missed school days/month decreased from 4.6 ± 1.7 to 1.4 ± 3.2 (P < 0.05); social activities/week increased from 0.3 ± 0.6 to 1.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.05); physician office contacts/year decreased from 24 ± 10.2 to 8.7 ± 13.1 (P = 0.07). PedsQL® scores (0 to 100 scale) improved from 55.3 ± 11.9 to 80.0 ± 10.7 (P < 0.03). Guided imagery and progressive relaxation can safely and effectively reduce chronic abdominal pain in children with FGIDs. This treatment also improved social functioning and school attendance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-196
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abdominal Pain
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Autogenic Training
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Chronic Pain
Quality of Life
Relaxation Therapy
Therapeutics
Pain
Physicians' Offices
Pediatrics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Youssef, Nader N. ; Rosh, Joel ; Loughran, Mary ; Schuckalo, Stephanie G. ; Cotter, Ann N. ; Verga, Barbara G. ; Mones, Richard L. / Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood With Cognitive Behavioral Strategies. In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. 2004 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 192-196.
@article{52a3081cb9d245728b37a089171a577b,
title = "Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood With Cognitive Behavioral Strategies",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral approach to the treatment of recurrent abdominal pain caused by childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). From September 2001 to December 2002, 18 patients (12 male; mean age, 12.1 ± 4.9 years) with chronic abdominal pain (mean duration, 11.8 ± 13.3 months) caused by FGIDs were referred to our facility’s mind-body institute (MBI). Treatment included guided imagery and progressive relaxation techniques. The mean number of sessions per patient was 4.3 ± 3.4. Outcomes included change in abdominal pain and quality of life, evaluated by the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL{\circledR}). Follow-up was 10.6 ± 2.3 months after the last MBI session. Abdominal pain improved in 89{\%} of patients; weekly pain episodes decreased from 5.5 ± 0.9 to 2.0 ± 2.7 (P < 0.05); pain intensity (0 to 3 scale) decreased from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 0.6 ± 0.7 (P < 0.04); missed school days/month decreased from 4.6 ± 1.7 to 1.4 ± 3.2 (P < 0.05); social activities/week increased from 0.3 ± 0.6 to 1.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.05); physician office contacts/year decreased from 24 ± 10.2 to 8.7 ± 13.1 (P = 0.07). PedsQL{\circledR} scores (0 to 100 scale) improved from 55.3 ± 11.9 to 80.0 ± 10.7 (P < 0.03). Guided imagery and progressive relaxation can safely and effectively reduce chronic abdominal pain in children with FGIDs. This treatment also improved social functioning and school attendance.",
author = "Youssef, {Nader N.} and Joel Rosh and Mary Loughran and Schuckalo, {Stephanie G.} and Cotter, {Ann N.} and Verga, {Barbara G.} and Mones, {Richard L.}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00005176-200408000-00013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "192--196",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition",
issn = "0277-2116",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood With Cognitive Behavioral Strategies. / Youssef, Nader N.; Rosh, Joel; Loughran, Mary; Schuckalo, Stephanie G.; Cotter, Ann N.; Verga, Barbara G.; Mones, Richard L.

In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 192-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood With Cognitive Behavioral Strategies

AU - Youssef, Nader N.

AU - Rosh, Joel

AU - Loughran, Mary

AU - Schuckalo, Stephanie G.

AU - Cotter, Ann N.

AU - Verga, Barbara G.

AU - Mones, Richard L.

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral approach to the treatment of recurrent abdominal pain caused by childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). From September 2001 to December 2002, 18 patients (12 male; mean age, 12.1 ± 4.9 years) with chronic abdominal pain (mean duration, 11.8 ± 13.3 months) caused by FGIDs were referred to our facility’s mind-body institute (MBI). Treatment included guided imagery and progressive relaxation techniques. The mean number of sessions per patient was 4.3 ± 3.4. Outcomes included change in abdominal pain and quality of life, evaluated by the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL®). Follow-up was 10.6 ± 2.3 months after the last MBI session. Abdominal pain improved in 89% of patients; weekly pain episodes decreased from 5.5 ± 0.9 to 2.0 ± 2.7 (P < 0.05); pain intensity (0 to 3 scale) decreased from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 0.6 ± 0.7 (P < 0.04); missed school days/month decreased from 4.6 ± 1.7 to 1.4 ± 3.2 (P < 0.05); social activities/week increased from 0.3 ± 0.6 to 1.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.05); physician office contacts/year decreased from 24 ± 10.2 to 8.7 ± 13.1 (P = 0.07). PedsQL® scores (0 to 100 scale) improved from 55.3 ± 11.9 to 80.0 ± 10.7 (P < 0.03). Guided imagery and progressive relaxation can safely and effectively reduce chronic abdominal pain in children with FGIDs. This treatment also improved social functioning and school attendance.

AB - The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral approach to the treatment of recurrent abdominal pain caused by childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). From September 2001 to December 2002, 18 patients (12 male; mean age, 12.1 ± 4.9 years) with chronic abdominal pain (mean duration, 11.8 ± 13.3 months) caused by FGIDs were referred to our facility’s mind-body institute (MBI). Treatment included guided imagery and progressive relaxation techniques. The mean number of sessions per patient was 4.3 ± 3.4. Outcomes included change in abdominal pain and quality of life, evaluated by the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale (PedsQL®). Follow-up was 10.6 ± 2.3 months after the last MBI session. Abdominal pain improved in 89% of patients; weekly pain episodes decreased from 5.5 ± 0.9 to 2.0 ± 2.7 (P < 0.05); pain intensity (0 to 3 scale) decreased from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 0.6 ± 0.7 (P < 0.04); missed school days/month decreased from 4.6 ± 1.7 to 1.4 ± 3.2 (P < 0.05); social activities/week increased from 0.3 ± 0.6 to 1.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.05); physician office contacts/year decreased from 24 ± 10.2 to 8.7 ± 13.1 (P = 0.07). PedsQL® scores (0 to 100 scale) improved from 55.3 ± 11.9 to 80.0 ± 10.7 (P < 0.03). Guided imagery and progressive relaxation can safely and effectively reduce chronic abdominal pain in children with FGIDs. This treatment also improved social functioning and school attendance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10844278566&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10844278566&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00005176-200408000-00013

DO - 10.1097/00005176-200408000-00013

M3 - Article

C2 - 15269627

AN - SCOPUS:10844278566

VL - 39

SP - 192

EP - 196

JO - Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

JF - Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

SN - 0277-2116

IS - 2

ER -