The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency: A problem of quantity?

Clifford Sales, David Rosenthal, Kathleen A. Petrillo, Hilde S. Jerivs, John Matsuura, Michael D. Clark, Michael A. Pontoriero, Donald C. Syracuse, Norman L. Luka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abnormal venous valvular function may produce venous reflux and venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency, little work has been done on the relative number of greater saphenous vein (gsv) valves in patients with venous insufficiency. This study investigates whether the Gsv in patients with symptomatic venous insufficiency has fewer valves than the Gsv of patients without venous insufficiency. The number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 51) with symptomatic venous insufficiency undergoing saphenectomy (vi) were compared with the number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 26) without venous insufficiency undergoing in situ Gsv bypass under angiescopic surveillance who served as a control group. The two groups differed, as expected, in age and sex distribution. The Vi group had a mean of 25.7 ± 11.0 centimeters of Gsv between valves, while the control group had 19.0 ± 9.7 centimeters of GSV between valves (F = 6.99; p = 0.01). The mean number of valves in the saphenous veins of the two groups also differed significantly: VI = 2.3 ± 0.83 versus control (CTRL) = 4.8 ± 2.01 (F = 61.86; p < 0.0001). That properly functioning valve leaflets help maintain physiologic antegrade venous flow is indisputable. This study, however, suggests that the relative lack of valves may be related to the development of venous insufficiency. This report documents that patients with symptomatic reflux in the GSV have significantly fewer valves than patients with apparently normal functioning saphenous veins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-155
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Venous Insufficiency
Saphenous Vein
Control Groups
Sex Distribution
Age Distribution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Sales, C., Rosenthal, D., Petrillo, K. A., Jerivs, H. S., Matsuura, J., Clark, M. D., ... Luka, N. L. (1998). The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency: A problem of quantity? Annals of Vascular Surgery, 12(2), 153-155. https://doi.org/10.1007/s100169900133
Sales, Clifford ; Rosenthal, David ; Petrillo, Kathleen A. ; Jerivs, Hilde S. ; Matsuura, John ; Clark, Michael D. ; Pontoriero, Michael A. ; Syracuse, Donald C. ; Luka, Norman L. / The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency : A problem of quantity?. In: Annals of Vascular Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 153-155.
@article{ee3f4b575f7b4a3d8563cdddc4ea0257,
title = "The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency: A problem of quantity?",
abstract = "Abnormal venous valvular function may produce venous reflux and venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency, little work has been done on the relative number of greater saphenous vein (gsv) valves in patients with venous insufficiency. This study investigates whether the Gsv in patients with symptomatic venous insufficiency has fewer valves than the Gsv of patients without venous insufficiency. The number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 51) with symptomatic venous insufficiency undergoing saphenectomy (vi) were compared with the number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 26) without venous insufficiency undergoing in situ Gsv bypass under angiescopic surveillance who served as a control group. The two groups differed, as expected, in age and sex distribution. The Vi group had a mean of 25.7 ± 11.0 centimeters of Gsv between valves, while the control group had 19.0 ± 9.7 centimeters of GSV between valves (F = 6.99; p = 0.01). The mean number of valves in the saphenous veins of the two groups also differed significantly: VI = 2.3 ± 0.83 versus control (CTRL) = 4.8 ± 2.01 (F = 61.86; p < 0.0001). That properly functioning valve leaflets help maintain physiologic antegrade venous flow is indisputable. This study, however, suggests that the relative lack of valves may be related to the development of venous insufficiency. This report documents that patients with symptomatic reflux in the GSV have significantly fewer valves than patients with apparently normal functioning saphenous veins.",
author = "Clifford Sales and David Rosenthal and Petrillo, {Kathleen A.} and Jerivs, {Hilde S.} and John Matsuura and Clark, {Michael D.} and Pontoriero, {Michael A.} and Syracuse, {Donald C.} and Luka, {Norman L.}",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s100169900133",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "153--155",
journal = "Annals of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0890-5096",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Sales, C, Rosenthal, D, Petrillo, KA, Jerivs, HS, Matsuura, J, Clark, MD, Pontoriero, MA, Syracuse, DC & Luka, NL 1998, 'The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency: A problem of quantity?', Annals of Vascular Surgery, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 153-155. https://doi.org/10.1007/s100169900133

The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency : A problem of quantity? / Sales, Clifford; Rosenthal, David; Petrillo, Kathleen A.; Jerivs, Hilde S.; Matsuura, John; Clark, Michael D.; Pontoriero, Michael A.; Syracuse, Donald C.; Luka, Norman L.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 153-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency

T2 - A problem of quantity?

AU - Sales, Clifford

AU - Rosenthal, David

AU - Petrillo, Kathleen A.

AU - Jerivs, Hilde S.

AU - Matsuura, John

AU - Clark, Michael D.

AU - Pontoriero, Michael A.

AU - Syracuse, Donald C.

AU - Luka, Norman L.

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - Abnormal venous valvular function may produce venous reflux and venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency, little work has been done on the relative number of greater saphenous vein (gsv) valves in patients with venous insufficiency. This study investigates whether the Gsv in patients with symptomatic venous insufficiency has fewer valves than the Gsv of patients without venous insufficiency. The number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 51) with symptomatic venous insufficiency undergoing saphenectomy (vi) were compared with the number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 26) without venous insufficiency undergoing in situ Gsv bypass under angiescopic surveillance who served as a control group. The two groups differed, as expected, in age and sex distribution. The Vi group had a mean of 25.7 ± 11.0 centimeters of Gsv between valves, while the control group had 19.0 ± 9.7 centimeters of GSV between valves (F = 6.99; p = 0.01). The mean number of valves in the saphenous veins of the two groups also differed significantly: VI = 2.3 ± 0.83 versus control (CTRL) = 4.8 ± 2.01 (F = 61.86; p < 0.0001). That properly functioning valve leaflets help maintain physiologic antegrade venous flow is indisputable. This study, however, suggests that the relative lack of valves may be related to the development of venous insufficiency. This report documents that patients with symptomatic reflux in the GSV have significantly fewer valves than patients with apparently normal functioning saphenous veins.

AB - Abnormal venous valvular function may produce venous reflux and venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency. While valvular agenesis is a known, but rare cause of venous insufficiency, little work has been done on the relative number of greater saphenous vein (gsv) valves in patients with venous insufficiency. This study investigates whether the Gsv in patients with symptomatic venous insufficiency has fewer valves than the Gsv of patients without venous insufficiency. The number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 51) with symptomatic venous insufficiency undergoing saphenectomy (vi) were compared with the number of Gsv valves in patients (n = 26) without venous insufficiency undergoing in situ Gsv bypass under angiescopic surveillance who served as a control group. The two groups differed, as expected, in age and sex distribution. The Vi group had a mean of 25.7 ± 11.0 centimeters of Gsv between valves, while the control group had 19.0 ± 9.7 centimeters of GSV between valves (F = 6.99; p = 0.01). The mean number of valves in the saphenous veins of the two groups also differed significantly: VI = 2.3 ± 0.83 versus control (CTRL) = 4.8 ± 2.01 (F = 61.86; p < 0.0001). That properly functioning valve leaflets help maintain physiologic antegrade venous flow is indisputable. This study, however, suggests that the relative lack of valves may be related to the development of venous insufficiency. This report documents that patients with symptomatic reflux in the GSV have significantly fewer valves than patients with apparently normal functioning saphenous veins.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031907159&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031907159&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s100169900133

DO - 10.1007/s100169900133

M3 - Article

C2 - 9514234

AN - SCOPUS:0031907159

VL - 12

SP - 153

EP - 155

JO - Annals of Vascular Surgery

JF - Annals of Vascular Surgery

SN - 0890-5096

IS - 2

ER -

Sales C, Rosenthal D, Petrillo KA, Jerivs HS, Matsuura J, Clark MD et al. The valvular apparatus in venous insufficiency: A problem of quantity? Annals of Vascular Surgery. 1998 Jan 1;12(2):153-155. https://doi.org/10.1007/s100169900133