The significance of routine postoperative 12-lead EKG changes and creatine kinase (CK-MB) elevation in patients with major abdominal vascular surgery

Ajay Goyal, Vishal Mehta, Bashar Fahoum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: A retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of postoperative electrocardiograms (EKGs) and cardiac enzymes in patients who had undergone major abdominal and vascular surgery. Method: Two hundred and thirteen patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a community hospital were followed postoperatively. All patients who underwent major abdominal or vascular surgery had routine postoperative EKGs and cardiac enzymes performed every eight hours for a period of 24 hours. All patients also had preoperative 12-lead EKGs and these were compared post-operatively for significant changes. Patients who had postoperative signs or symptoms of a myocardial event were excluded from the study. Results: Results show that four patients out of 213 patients examined had a silent myocardial infarction postoperatively. Three myocardial infarctions were identified by significant 12-lead EKG changes and one identified with elevated cardiac enzymes. Conclusion: Routine postoperative screening to identify and treat myocardial infarction in patients undergoing major abdominal and vascular surgery could have diagnostic as well as therapeutic value. In our study two percent of patients were found to have postoperative myocardial infarction (silent). Obtaining routine EKGs and cardiac enzymes postoperative is not cost effective because of the low percentage of patients identified with postoperative myocardial infarction. Further studies are needed to identify high risk patients who might benefit from routine postoperative EKGs and cardiac enzymes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume27
Issue number12 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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MB Form Creatine Kinase
Blood Vessels
Electrocardiography
Myocardial Infarction
Enzymes
Lead
Community Hospital
Critical Care
Signs and Symptoms
Intensive Care Units
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

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title = "The significance of routine postoperative 12-lead EKG changes and creatine kinase (CK-MB) elevation in patients with major abdominal vascular surgery",
abstract = "Introduction: A retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of postoperative electrocardiograms (EKGs) and cardiac enzymes in patients who had undergone major abdominal and vascular surgery. Method: Two hundred and thirteen patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a community hospital were followed postoperatively. All patients who underwent major abdominal or vascular surgery had routine postoperative EKGs and cardiac enzymes performed every eight hours for a period of 24 hours. All patients also had preoperative 12-lead EKGs and these were compared post-operatively for significant changes. Patients who had postoperative signs or symptoms of a myocardial event were excluded from the study. Results: Results show that four patients out of 213 patients examined had a silent myocardial infarction postoperatively. Three myocardial infarctions were identified by significant 12-lead EKG changes and one identified with elevated cardiac enzymes. Conclusion: Routine postoperative screening to identify and treat myocardial infarction in patients undergoing major abdominal and vascular surgery could have diagnostic as well as therapeutic value. In our study two percent of patients were found to have postoperative myocardial infarction (silent). Obtaining routine EKGs and cardiac enzymes postoperative is not cost effective because of the low percentage of patients identified with postoperative myocardial infarction. Further studies are needed to identify high risk patients who might benefit from routine postoperative EKGs and cardiac enzymes.",
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The significance of routine postoperative 12-lead EKG changes and creatine kinase (CK-MB) elevation in patients with major abdominal vascular surgery. / Goyal, Ajay; Mehta, Vishal; Fahoum, Bashar.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 12 SUPPL., 01.12.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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