The relationship between placental histology and cervical ultrasonography in women at risk for pregnancy loss and spontaneous preterm birth

Edwin R. Guzman, Susan Shen-Schwarz, Carlos Benito, Anthony M. Vintzileos, Marian Lake, Yu Ling Lai

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25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether there were any differences in the placental lesions of high-risk patients with versus without ultrasonographic evidence of cervical shortening between 15 and 24 weeks' gestation. STUDY DESIGN: Women who were at risk for pregnancy loss and spontaneous preterm birth were followed by serial transvaginal cervical ultrasonography with transfundal pressure between 15 and 24 weeks' gestation. Two groups of women were identified: those in whom progressive cervical shortening developed to below 2 cm, either spontaneously or induced by transfundal pressure, and those in whom it did not. A perinatal pathologist who was blinded to the pregnancy outcome retrospectively examined placental histologic slides. The histologic placental lesions were categorized as acute or chronic inflammatory lesions, decidual vascular lesions, and coagulation- related lesions. RESULTS: There were 278 women who were followed during the study. Placentas were submitted for histologic examination in 189 cases (125 singleton, 45 twin, and 19 triplet gestations). There were 72 pregnancies with and 117 pregnancies without an ultrasonographic diagnosis of cervical shortening, respectively. Overall, there were significantly more acute inflammatory lesions in patients in whom cervical shortening developed, as determined by ultrasonographic examination. However, there were significantly more decidual vascular lesions in women in whom cervical shortening did not develop. When we examined the distribution of the placental histologic lesions in the 64 cases of multiple gestations, the only significant finding was again a greater frequency of acute inflammatory lesions in patients in whom cervical shortening developed. There was no difference in the distribution of the placental histologic lesion categories among women treated with bed rest versus cervical cerclage because of the ultrasound diagnosis of cervical shortening. CONCLUSION: Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta were more frequent in patients with second-trimester cervical shortening. These findings support that patients with cervical shortening in the second trimester are prone to acute placental inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-797
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume181
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Premature Birth
Ultrasonography
Histology
Pregnancy
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Placenta
Blood Vessels
Cervical Cerclage
Pressure
Bed Rest
Pregnancy Outcome
Inflammation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Guzman, Edwin R. ; Shen-Schwarz, Susan ; Benito, Carlos ; Vintzileos, Anthony M. ; Lake, Marian ; Lai, Yu Ling. / The relationship between placental histology and cervical ultrasonography in women at risk for pregnancy loss and spontaneous preterm birth. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1999 ; Vol. 181, No. 4. pp. 793-797.
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The relationship between placental histology and cervical ultrasonography in women at risk for pregnancy loss and spontaneous preterm birth. / Guzman, Edwin R.; Shen-Schwarz, Susan; Benito, Carlos; Vintzileos, Anthony M.; Lake, Marian; Lai, Yu Ling.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 181, No. 4, 01.01.1999, p. 793-797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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