The interplay of physician awareness and reporting of incidentally found coronary artery calcium on the clinical management of patients who underwent noncontrast chest computed tomography

Seth Uretsky, Neel Chokshi, Todd Kobrinski, Shiv K. Agarwal, Jose R. Po, Hira Awan, Ashadevi Jagarlamudi, Sai P. Gudiwada, Robert C. D'Avino, Alan Rozanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have shown that coronary artery calcium (CAC) incidentally identified on a noncontrast chest computed tomography (NCCT) performed for noncardiac indications has diagnostic and prognostic value. The frequency by which radiologists report incidental CAC and its impact on patient management are unknown. This study included 204 consecutive patients (63 ± 17 years, 59% men) without a history of coronary artery disease referred for an NCCT for noncardiac indications. The presence of CAC was determined by an expert cardiologist and compared with the radiology report. For each patient, the medical record was reviewed for changes in medications. Physicians caring for these patients were surveyed regarding their awareness and the clinical importance of incidental CAC after their patients had been discharged from the hospital. There were 108 of 201 patients (53%) with a CAC score >0 as determined by an expert reader. The interpreting radiologist reported the presence of CAC in 74 of 108 patients (69%). Of the 74 patients, there was an increase in stain and aspirin prescription of 4% and 5%, respectively. Of the 132 physicians surveyed, 54% of physicians surveyed believed that CAC on an NCCT scan was analogous to the presence of coronary artery disease, 23% were aware that incidental CAC was reported, and only 4% said they would make medical management decisions based on the finding of incidental CAC. In conclusion, incidental CAC is under-reported by the interpreting radiologists and suggests an integral role for a cardiovascular imaging specialist. When incidental CAC is reported, physicians are not cognizant of the meaning and importance of this finding. This lack of knowledge is reflected in the negligible impact reported incidental CAC has on clinical management decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1513-1517
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume115
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coronary Vessels
Thorax
Tomography
Calcium
Physicians
Coronary Artery Disease
Incidental Findings
Radiology
Aspirin
Medical Records
Prescriptions
Coloring Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Uretsky, Seth ; Chokshi, Neel ; Kobrinski, Todd ; Agarwal, Shiv K. ; Po, Jose R. ; Awan, Hira ; Jagarlamudi, Ashadevi ; Gudiwada, Sai P. ; D'Avino, Robert C. ; Rozanski, Alan. / The interplay of physician awareness and reporting of incidentally found coronary artery calcium on the clinical management of patients who underwent noncontrast chest computed tomography. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2015 ; Vol. 115, No. 11. pp. 1513-1517.
@article{422f8bb9c9564892a0f5611cc0254ccf,
title = "The interplay of physician awareness and reporting of incidentally found coronary artery calcium on the clinical management of patients who underwent noncontrast chest computed tomography",
abstract = "Studies have shown that coronary artery calcium (CAC) incidentally identified on a noncontrast chest computed tomography (NCCT) performed for noncardiac indications has diagnostic and prognostic value. The frequency by which radiologists report incidental CAC and its impact on patient management are unknown. This study included 204 consecutive patients (63 ± 17 years, 59{\%} men) without a history of coronary artery disease referred for an NCCT for noncardiac indications. The presence of CAC was determined by an expert cardiologist and compared with the radiology report. For each patient, the medical record was reviewed for changes in medications. Physicians caring for these patients were surveyed regarding their awareness and the clinical importance of incidental CAC after their patients had been discharged from the hospital. There were 108 of 201 patients (53{\%}) with a CAC score >0 as determined by an expert reader. The interpreting radiologist reported the presence of CAC in 74 of 108 patients (69{\%}). Of the 74 patients, there was an increase in stain and aspirin prescription of 4{\%} and 5{\%}, respectively. Of the 132 physicians surveyed, 54{\%} of physicians surveyed believed that CAC on an NCCT scan was analogous to the presence of coronary artery disease, 23{\%} were aware that incidental CAC was reported, and only 4{\%} said they would make medical management decisions based on the finding of incidental CAC. In conclusion, incidental CAC is under-reported by the interpreting radiologists and suggests an integral role for a cardiovascular imaging specialist. When incidental CAC is reported, physicians are not cognizant of the meaning and importance of this finding. This lack of knowledge is reflected in the negligible impact reported incidental CAC has on clinical management decisions.",
author = "Seth Uretsky and Neel Chokshi and Todd Kobrinski and Agarwal, {Shiv K.} and Po, {Jose R.} and Hira Awan and Ashadevi Jagarlamudi and Gudiwada, {Sai P.} and D'Avino, {Robert C.} and Alan Rozanski",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.02.051",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "115",
pages = "1513--1517",
journal = "American Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0002-9149",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "11",

}

The interplay of physician awareness and reporting of incidentally found coronary artery calcium on the clinical management of patients who underwent noncontrast chest computed tomography. / Uretsky, Seth; Chokshi, Neel; Kobrinski, Todd; Agarwal, Shiv K.; Po, Jose R.; Awan, Hira; Jagarlamudi, Ashadevi; Gudiwada, Sai P.; D'Avino, Robert C.; Rozanski, Alan.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 115, No. 11, 01.01.2015, p. 1513-1517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The interplay of physician awareness and reporting of incidentally found coronary artery calcium on the clinical management of patients who underwent noncontrast chest computed tomography

AU - Uretsky, Seth

AU - Chokshi, Neel

AU - Kobrinski, Todd

AU - Agarwal, Shiv K.

AU - Po, Jose R.

AU - Awan, Hira

AU - Jagarlamudi, Ashadevi

AU - Gudiwada, Sai P.

AU - D'Avino, Robert C.

AU - Rozanski, Alan

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Studies have shown that coronary artery calcium (CAC) incidentally identified on a noncontrast chest computed tomography (NCCT) performed for noncardiac indications has diagnostic and prognostic value. The frequency by which radiologists report incidental CAC and its impact on patient management are unknown. This study included 204 consecutive patients (63 ± 17 years, 59% men) without a history of coronary artery disease referred for an NCCT for noncardiac indications. The presence of CAC was determined by an expert cardiologist and compared with the radiology report. For each patient, the medical record was reviewed for changes in medications. Physicians caring for these patients were surveyed regarding their awareness and the clinical importance of incidental CAC after their patients had been discharged from the hospital. There were 108 of 201 patients (53%) with a CAC score >0 as determined by an expert reader. The interpreting radiologist reported the presence of CAC in 74 of 108 patients (69%). Of the 74 patients, there was an increase in stain and aspirin prescription of 4% and 5%, respectively. Of the 132 physicians surveyed, 54% of physicians surveyed believed that CAC on an NCCT scan was analogous to the presence of coronary artery disease, 23% were aware that incidental CAC was reported, and only 4% said they would make medical management decisions based on the finding of incidental CAC. In conclusion, incidental CAC is under-reported by the interpreting radiologists and suggests an integral role for a cardiovascular imaging specialist. When incidental CAC is reported, physicians are not cognizant of the meaning and importance of this finding. This lack of knowledge is reflected in the negligible impact reported incidental CAC has on clinical management decisions.

AB - Studies have shown that coronary artery calcium (CAC) incidentally identified on a noncontrast chest computed tomography (NCCT) performed for noncardiac indications has diagnostic and prognostic value. The frequency by which radiologists report incidental CAC and its impact on patient management are unknown. This study included 204 consecutive patients (63 ± 17 years, 59% men) without a history of coronary artery disease referred for an NCCT for noncardiac indications. The presence of CAC was determined by an expert cardiologist and compared with the radiology report. For each patient, the medical record was reviewed for changes in medications. Physicians caring for these patients were surveyed regarding their awareness and the clinical importance of incidental CAC after their patients had been discharged from the hospital. There were 108 of 201 patients (53%) with a CAC score >0 as determined by an expert reader. The interpreting radiologist reported the presence of CAC in 74 of 108 patients (69%). Of the 74 patients, there was an increase in stain and aspirin prescription of 4% and 5%, respectively. Of the 132 physicians surveyed, 54% of physicians surveyed believed that CAC on an NCCT scan was analogous to the presence of coronary artery disease, 23% were aware that incidental CAC was reported, and only 4% said they would make medical management decisions based on the finding of incidental CAC. In conclusion, incidental CAC is under-reported by the interpreting radiologists and suggests an integral role for a cardiovascular imaging specialist. When incidental CAC is reported, physicians are not cognizant of the meaning and importance of this finding. This lack of knowledge is reflected in the negligible impact reported incidental CAC has on clinical management decisions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929279243&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929279243&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.02.051

DO - 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.02.051

M3 - Article

VL - 115

SP - 1513

EP - 1517

JO - American Journal of Cardiology

JF - American Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0002-9149

IS - 11

ER -