The correlation between HIV seropositivity, cervical dysplasia, and HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35

George Tweddel, Paul Heller, Mary Cunnane, Hinke Multhaupt, Katalin Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-one human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients were studied to determine the prevalence of cervical dysplasia, the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) subtypes, and the utility of cytologic diagnosis in this population. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 41 years. HIV infection was diagnosed in all patients by ELISA method and confirmed by Western blot. Patients were interviewed to document risk factors for HIV infection and cervical dysplasia. All were examined colposcopically and identifiable lesions were biopsied. In patients with normal colposcopic findings four quadrant biopsies were performed. Cervical and endocervical smears were obtained on all patients at the time of colposcopy and blood was collected for T-cell studies. Eighteen patients (86%) had abnormal cytologic findings. The Pap smear was able to identify 10 of 13 biopsy-proven epithelial abnormalities. In 14 patients there was sufficient tissue for HPV typing by in situ hybridization; the HPV subtypes identified were 6/11 (10 patients), 16/18 (9 patients), and 31/33/35 (9 patients). Dysplasia was present in 11/14 (79%) of the specimens submitted for subtyping. The absolute CD4 cell counts were 342 per mm3 for the dysplasia group and 281 per mm3 for the patients without dysplasia. Patients with dysplasia did not differ significantly from patients without dysplasia in regard to risk factors for cervical dysplasia, including history of STD, tobacco use, multiple sexual partners, age at first coitus, and parity. In addition, history of medication use and risk factors associated with HIV infection were similar in both groups. Length of HIV seropositivity was also equivalent in both groups. We conclude that there is an association between HIV seropositivity, presence of HPV, and cervical dysplasia. A single Pap smear was unable to identify 3 of 13 patients with biopsy-proven dysplasia for a false-negative rate of 23%. The presence or absence of cervical dysplasia did not correlate with the CD4 count. We recommend that all HIV-positive women are aggressively followed for cervical epithelial abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-164
Number of pages4
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papillomaviridae
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia
HIV
Virus Diseases
Papanicolaou Test
Sexual Partners
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Tweddel, George ; Heller, Paul ; Cunnane, Mary ; Multhaupt, Hinke ; Roth, Katalin. / The correlation between HIV seropositivity, cervical dysplasia, and HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 1994 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 161-164.
@article{ed9ab51255164f57802c0c51dbe6aea6,
title = "The correlation between HIV seropositivity, cervical dysplasia, and HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35",
abstract = "Twenty-one human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients were studied to determine the prevalence of cervical dysplasia, the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) subtypes, and the utility of cytologic diagnosis in this population. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 41 years. HIV infection was diagnosed in all patients by ELISA method and confirmed by Western blot. Patients were interviewed to document risk factors for HIV infection and cervical dysplasia. All were examined colposcopically and identifiable lesions were biopsied. In patients with normal colposcopic findings four quadrant biopsies were performed. Cervical and endocervical smears were obtained on all patients at the time of colposcopy and blood was collected for T-cell studies. Eighteen patients (86{\%}) had abnormal cytologic findings. The Pap smear was able to identify 10 of 13 biopsy-proven epithelial abnormalities. In 14 patients there was sufficient tissue for HPV typing by in situ hybridization; the HPV subtypes identified were 6/11 (10 patients), 16/18 (9 patients), and 31/33/35 (9 patients). Dysplasia was present in 11/14 (79{\%}) of the specimens submitted for subtyping. The absolute CD4 cell counts were 342 per mm3 for the dysplasia group and 281 per mm3 for the patients without dysplasia. Patients with dysplasia did not differ significantly from patients without dysplasia in regard to risk factors for cervical dysplasia, including history of STD, tobacco use, multiple sexual partners, age at first coitus, and parity. In addition, history of medication use and risk factors associated with HIV infection were similar in both groups. Length of HIV seropositivity was also equivalent in both groups. We conclude that there is an association between HIV seropositivity, presence of HPV, and cervical dysplasia. A single Pap smear was unable to identify 3 of 13 patients with biopsy-proven dysplasia for a false-negative rate of 23{\%}. The presence or absence of cervical dysplasia did not correlate with the CD4 count. We recommend that all HIV-positive women are aggressively followed for cervical epithelial abnormalities.",
author = "George Tweddel and Paul Heller and Mary Cunnane and Hinke Multhaupt and Katalin Roth",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1006/gyno.1994.1024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "161--164",
journal = "Gynecologic Oncology",
issn = "0090-8258",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

The correlation between HIV seropositivity, cervical dysplasia, and HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35. / Tweddel, George; Heller, Paul; Cunnane, Mary; Multhaupt, Hinke; Roth, Katalin.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 52, No. 2, 01.01.1994, p. 161-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The correlation between HIV seropositivity, cervical dysplasia, and HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35

AU - Tweddel, George

AU - Heller, Paul

AU - Cunnane, Mary

AU - Multhaupt, Hinke

AU - Roth, Katalin

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - Twenty-one human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients were studied to determine the prevalence of cervical dysplasia, the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) subtypes, and the utility of cytologic diagnosis in this population. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 41 years. HIV infection was diagnosed in all patients by ELISA method and confirmed by Western blot. Patients were interviewed to document risk factors for HIV infection and cervical dysplasia. All were examined colposcopically and identifiable lesions were biopsied. In patients with normal colposcopic findings four quadrant biopsies were performed. Cervical and endocervical smears were obtained on all patients at the time of colposcopy and blood was collected for T-cell studies. Eighteen patients (86%) had abnormal cytologic findings. The Pap smear was able to identify 10 of 13 biopsy-proven epithelial abnormalities. In 14 patients there was sufficient tissue for HPV typing by in situ hybridization; the HPV subtypes identified were 6/11 (10 patients), 16/18 (9 patients), and 31/33/35 (9 patients). Dysplasia was present in 11/14 (79%) of the specimens submitted for subtyping. The absolute CD4 cell counts were 342 per mm3 for the dysplasia group and 281 per mm3 for the patients without dysplasia. Patients with dysplasia did not differ significantly from patients without dysplasia in regard to risk factors for cervical dysplasia, including history of STD, tobacco use, multiple sexual partners, age at first coitus, and parity. In addition, history of medication use and risk factors associated with HIV infection were similar in both groups. Length of HIV seropositivity was also equivalent in both groups. We conclude that there is an association between HIV seropositivity, presence of HPV, and cervical dysplasia. A single Pap smear was unable to identify 3 of 13 patients with biopsy-proven dysplasia for a false-negative rate of 23%. The presence or absence of cervical dysplasia did not correlate with the CD4 count. We recommend that all HIV-positive women are aggressively followed for cervical epithelial abnormalities.

AB - Twenty-one human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients were studied to determine the prevalence of cervical dysplasia, the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) subtypes, and the utility of cytologic diagnosis in this population. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 41 years. HIV infection was diagnosed in all patients by ELISA method and confirmed by Western blot. Patients were interviewed to document risk factors for HIV infection and cervical dysplasia. All were examined colposcopically and identifiable lesions were biopsied. In patients with normal colposcopic findings four quadrant biopsies were performed. Cervical and endocervical smears were obtained on all patients at the time of colposcopy and blood was collected for T-cell studies. Eighteen patients (86%) had abnormal cytologic findings. The Pap smear was able to identify 10 of 13 biopsy-proven epithelial abnormalities. In 14 patients there was sufficient tissue for HPV typing by in situ hybridization; the HPV subtypes identified were 6/11 (10 patients), 16/18 (9 patients), and 31/33/35 (9 patients). Dysplasia was present in 11/14 (79%) of the specimens submitted for subtyping. The absolute CD4 cell counts were 342 per mm3 for the dysplasia group and 281 per mm3 for the patients without dysplasia. Patients with dysplasia did not differ significantly from patients without dysplasia in regard to risk factors for cervical dysplasia, including history of STD, tobacco use, multiple sexual partners, age at first coitus, and parity. In addition, history of medication use and risk factors associated with HIV infection were similar in both groups. Length of HIV seropositivity was also equivalent in both groups. We conclude that there is an association between HIV seropositivity, presence of HPV, and cervical dysplasia. A single Pap smear was unable to identify 3 of 13 patients with biopsy-proven dysplasia for a false-negative rate of 23%. The presence or absence of cervical dysplasia did not correlate with the CD4 count. We recommend that all HIV-positive women are aggressively followed for cervical epithelial abnormalities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028158118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028158118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/gyno.1994.1024

DO - 10.1006/gyno.1994.1024

M3 - Article

C2 - 8314133

AN - SCOPUS:0028158118

VL - 52

SP - 161

EP - 164

JO - Gynecologic Oncology

JF - Gynecologic Oncology

SN - 0090-8258

IS - 2

ER -