Stroke in patients with lyme disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, readily invades the central nervous system (CNS) and, in up to 15~ of patients, causes symptomatic meningitis or involvement of the cranial or spinal nerves. Parenchymal CNS disease is far less common; its pathophysiologic basis remains poorly understood. Proposed mechanisms range from direct infection, to vasculitis, to demyelination. Because it has not yet been reported in animal models, and because clinical data are extremely limited, it is necessary to try to deduce mechanisms by analogy to involvement in the peripheral nervous system and elsewhere, and to other related diseases. In particular, many have compared nervous system Lyme disease (neuroborreliosis) to neurosyphilis-a comparison that immediately raises the specter of meningovascular involvement. Several dozen case reports describing B. Burgdorferi infection-associated strokes have been published; whether a specific causal relationship exists is unclear. To understand the complexities of proving this association, it is important to appreciate some of the difficulties inherent in proving the diagnosis of Lyme disease in general, and nervous system infection in particular.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages59-66
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780511544897
ISBN (Print)9780521874373
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Disease
Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Stroke
Infection
Neurosyphilis
Spinal Nerves
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Cranial Nerves
Central Nervous System Diseases
Peripheral Nervous System
Demyelinating Diseases
Ticks
Vasculitis
Meningitis
Nervous System
Communicable Diseases
Central Nervous System
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Halperin, J. J. (2008). Stroke in patients with lyme disease. In Uncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition (pp. 59-66). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544897.011
Halperin, John J. / Stroke in patients with lyme disease. Uncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2008. pp. 59-66
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Halperin, JJ 2008, Stroke in patients with lyme disease. in Uncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press, pp. 59-66. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544897.011

Stroke in patients with lyme disease. / Halperin, John J.

Uncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2008. p. 59-66.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Halperin JJ. Stroke in patients with lyme disease. In Uncommon Causes of Stroke, 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008. p. 59-66 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544897.011