Signal Averaging of the Surface QRS Complex: Practical Applications

J. ANTHONY GOMES, Stephen Winters, JOHN IP

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Signal‐Averaged ECG. Signal averaging of the surface QRS complex has been used in recent years to detect electrical signals of small amplitude not otherwise evident on the surface ECG. The technique enables detection of low‐amplitude signals in the terminal portion of the QRS complex and the ST segment. These low‐amplitude signals termed late potentials (LPs) have been correlated with the presence of fragmented electrical activity recorded from endocardial and epicardial sites due to inhomogeneous propagation of conduction in scarred myocardium. Recent studies have supported the value of the signal‐averaged ECG for risk stratification postmyocardial infarction, in the management of patients with syncope and patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), and survivors of cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-330
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electrocardiography
Syncope
Ventricular Tachycardia
Heart Arrest
Infarction
Survivors
Myocardium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{376eae77342f4c1181d47656a255fb99,
title = "Signal Averaging of the Surface QRS Complex: Practical Applications",
abstract = "Signal‐Averaged ECG. Signal averaging of the surface QRS complex has been used in recent years to detect electrical signals of small amplitude not otherwise evident on the surface ECG. The technique enables detection of low‐amplitude signals in the terminal portion of the QRS complex and the ST segment. These low‐amplitude signals termed late potentials (LPs) have been correlated with the presence of fragmented electrical activity recorded from endocardial and epicardial sites due to inhomogeneous propagation of conduction in scarred myocardium. Recent studies have supported the value of the signal‐averaged ECG for risk stratification postmyocardial infarction, in the management of patients with syncope and patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), and survivors of cardiac arrest.",
author = "GOMES, {J. ANTHONY} and Stephen Winters and JOHN IP",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1540-8167.1991.tb01329.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "316--330",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology",
issn = "1045-3873",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

Signal Averaging of the Surface QRS Complex : Practical Applications. / GOMES, J. ANTHONY; Winters, Stephen; IP, JOHN.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 316-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Signal Averaging of the Surface QRS Complex

T2 - Practical Applications

AU - GOMES, J. ANTHONY

AU - Winters, Stephen

AU - IP, JOHN

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - Signal‐Averaged ECG. Signal averaging of the surface QRS complex has been used in recent years to detect electrical signals of small amplitude not otherwise evident on the surface ECG. The technique enables detection of low‐amplitude signals in the terminal portion of the QRS complex and the ST segment. These low‐amplitude signals termed late potentials (LPs) have been correlated with the presence of fragmented electrical activity recorded from endocardial and epicardial sites due to inhomogeneous propagation of conduction in scarred myocardium. Recent studies have supported the value of the signal‐averaged ECG for risk stratification postmyocardial infarction, in the management of patients with syncope and patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), and survivors of cardiac arrest.

AB - Signal‐Averaged ECG. Signal averaging of the surface QRS complex has been used in recent years to detect electrical signals of small amplitude not otherwise evident on the surface ECG. The technique enables detection of low‐amplitude signals in the terminal portion of the QRS complex and the ST segment. These low‐amplitude signals termed late potentials (LPs) have been correlated with the presence of fragmented electrical activity recorded from endocardial and epicardial sites due to inhomogeneous propagation of conduction in scarred myocardium. Recent studies have supported the value of the signal‐averaged ECG for risk stratification postmyocardial infarction, in the management of patients with syncope and patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), and survivors of cardiac arrest.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025774133&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025774133&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1540-8167.1991.tb01329.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1540-8167.1991.tb01329.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0025774133

VL - 2

SP - 316

EP - 330

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology

SN - 1045-3873

IS - 4

ER -