Short-term sleep deficits do not adversely affect acquisition of laparoscopic skills in a laboratory setting

A. Jensen, R. Milner, C. Fisher, J. Gaughan, Rolando Rolandelli, H. Grewal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Residents often are sleep deprived after being on call. This study evaluated the effects of these sleep deficits on the acquisition of laparoscopic skills in the laboratory setting. Methods: The amount of sleep on the preceding night was recorded for 40 residents undergoing surgical skills training. The residents underwent a pretest, training, practice, and a posttest using basic (pegboard, cup drop, rope pass) and task-specific (pattern cutting, clip application, loop application) drills. Time to completion, penalty score, and total score were assessed. Results: Significant improvements were seen in the time and total score for all six drills, with a significant decrease in penalty scores noted for the pegboard and rope pass drills. No significant differences in skill acquisition were attributable to amount of sleep. Conclusion: Training in the laboratory results in significant improvement of basic laparoscopic skills. Because short-term sleep deficits do not appear to hinder the acquisition of these skills, this model can be effectively applied, even after residents have been on call.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)948-953
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

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Surgical Instruments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Residents often are sleep deprived after being on call. This study evaluated the effects of these sleep deficits on the acquisition of laparoscopic skills in the laboratory setting. Methods: The amount of sleep on the preceding night was recorded for 40 residents undergoing surgical skills training. The residents underwent a pretest, training, practice, and a posttest using basic (pegboard, cup drop, rope pass) and task-specific (pattern cutting, clip application, loop application) drills. Time to completion, penalty score, and total score were assessed. Results: Significant improvements were seen in the time and total score for all six drills, with a significant decrease in penalty scores noted for the pegboard and rope pass drills. No significant differences in skill acquisition were attributable to amount of sleep. Conclusion: Training in the laboratory results in significant improvement of basic laparoscopic skills. Because short-term sleep deficits do not appear to hinder the acquisition of these skills, this model can be effectively applied, even after residents have been on call.",
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Short-term sleep deficits do not adversely affect acquisition of laparoscopic skills in a laboratory setting. / Jensen, A.; Milner, R.; Fisher, C.; Gaughan, J.; Rolandelli, Rolando; Grewal, H.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.06.2004, p. 948-953.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Short-term sleep deficits do not adversely affect acquisition of laparoscopic skills in a laboratory setting

AU - Jensen, A.

AU - Milner, R.

AU - Fisher, C.

AU - Gaughan, J.

AU - Rolandelli, Rolando

AU - Grewal, H.

PY - 2004/6/1

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N2 - Background: Residents often are sleep deprived after being on call. This study evaluated the effects of these sleep deficits on the acquisition of laparoscopic skills in the laboratory setting. Methods: The amount of sleep on the preceding night was recorded for 40 residents undergoing surgical skills training. The residents underwent a pretest, training, practice, and a posttest using basic (pegboard, cup drop, rope pass) and task-specific (pattern cutting, clip application, loop application) drills. Time to completion, penalty score, and total score were assessed. Results: Significant improvements were seen in the time and total score for all six drills, with a significant decrease in penalty scores noted for the pegboard and rope pass drills. No significant differences in skill acquisition were attributable to amount of sleep. Conclusion: Training in the laboratory results in significant improvement of basic laparoscopic skills. Because short-term sleep deficits do not appear to hinder the acquisition of these skills, this model can be effectively applied, even after residents have been on call.

AB - Background: Residents often are sleep deprived after being on call. This study evaluated the effects of these sleep deficits on the acquisition of laparoscopic skills in the laboratory setting. Methods: The amount of sleep on the preceding night was recorded for 40 residents undergoing surgical skills training. The residents underwent a pretest, training, practice, and a posttest using basic (pegboard, cup drop, rope pass) and task-specific (pattern cutting, clip application, loop application) drills. Time to completion, penalty score, and total score were assessed. Results: Significant improvements were seen in the time and total score for all six drills, with a significant decrease in penalty scores noted for the pegboard and rope pass drills. No significant differences in skill acquisition were attributable to amount of sleep. Conclusion: Training in the laboratory results in significant improvement of basic laparoscopic skills. Because short-term sleep deficits do not appear to hinder the acquisition of these skills, this model can be effectively applied, even after residents have been on call.

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