Safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in a prenatal clinic

Michelle Smith-Levitin, Enrique Hernandez, Lisa Anderson, Paul Heller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in pregnant women presenting for prenatal care to the obstetrics clinic, at Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital. STUDY DESIGN: From September 7, 1993, to November 5, 1993, 61 cervical cytologic smears were obtained using the Cell-Sweep. From November 8, 1993, to January 7, 1994, 66 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush, and from January 10, 1994, to February 18, 1994, 55 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/cotton swab. The rate of smears with no endocervical component or with epithelial cell abnormality was determined for each group. The patients' medical records were reviewed retrospectively to determine complications occurring within two weeks of smear collection. RESULTS: Fifteen (25%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, one (1.5%) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16%) in the cotton swab group were satisfactory but limited by absence of an endocervical component (P < .0006). None of the smears were unsatisfactory. Eleven (18%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, eight (12 %) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16 %) in the cotton swab group revealed an epithelial cell abnormality (P=.643). For all three groups there was a low rate of spontaneous abortion, preterm spontaneous rupture of membranes or preterm labor occurring within two weeks of collection. There was no statistically significant difference in these complications be tween the three groups (P = .7). The Ayre spatula/cotton swab is the least ex pensive device. CONCLUSION: The Ayre spatula/cotton swab was the most satisfactory of the three methods tested for obtaining cervical cytology during pregnancy. It is safe and cost-effective and identifies the same proportion of epithelial cell abnormalities as the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush and the Cell-Sweep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-753
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Volume41
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Cell Biology
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Epithelial Cells
Vaginal Smears
Spontaneous Rupture
Prenatal Care
Polysorbates
Premature Obstetric Labor
Spontaneous Abortion
Obstetrics
Medical Records
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy
Membranes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in a prenatal clinic",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in pregnant women presenting for prenatal care to the obstetrics clinic, at Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital. STUDY DESIGN: From September 7, 1993, to November 5, 1993, 61 cervical cytologic smears were obtained using the Cell-Sweep. From November 8, 1993, to January 7, 1994, 66 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush, and from January 10, 1994, to February 18, 1994, 55 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/cotton swab. The rate of smears with no endocervical component or with epithelial cell abnormality was determined for each group. The patients' medical records were reviewed retrospectively to determine complications occurring within two weeks of smear collection. RESULTS: Fifteen (25{\%}) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, one (1.5{\%}) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16{\%}) in the cotton swab group were satisfactory but limited by absence of an endocervical component (P < .0006). None of the smears were unsatisfactory. Eleven (18{\%}) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, eight (12 {\%}) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16 {\%}) in the cotton swab group revealed an epithelial cell abnormality (P=.643). For all three groups there was a low rate of spontaneous abortion, preterm spontaneous rupture of membranes or preterm labor occurring within two weeks of collection. There was no statistically significant difference in these complications be tween the three groups (P = .7). The Ayre spatula/cotton swab is the least ex pensive device. CONCLUSION: The Ayre spatula/cotton swab was the most satisfactory of the three methods tested for obtaining cervical cytology during pregnancy. It is safe and cost-effective and identifies the same proportion of epithelial cell abnormalities as the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush and the Cell-Sweep.",
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Safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in a prenatal clinic. / Smith-Levitin, Michelle; Hernandez, Enrique; Anderson, Lisa; Heller, Paul.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Vol. 41, No. 10, 01.10.1996, p. 749-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in pregnant women presenting for prenatal care to the obstetrics clinic, at Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital. STUDY DESIGN: From September 7, 1993, to November 5, 1993, 61 cervical cytologic smears were obtained using the Cell-Sweep. From November 8, 1993, to January 7, 1994, 66 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush, and from January 10, 1994, to February 18, 1994, 55 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/cotton swab. The rate of smears with no endocervical component or with epithelial cell abnormality was determined for each group. The patients' medical records were reviewed retrospectively to determine complications occurring within two weeks of smear collection. RESULTS: Fifteen (25%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, one (1.5%) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16%) in the cotton swab group were satisfactory but limited by absence of an endocervical component (P < .0006). None of the smears were unsatisfactory. Eleven (18%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, eight (12 %) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16 %) in the cotton swab group revealed an epithelial cell abnormality (P=.643). For all three groups there was a low rate of spontaneous abortion, preterm spontaneous rupture of membranes or preterm labor occurring within two weeks of collection. There was no statistically significant difference in these complications be tween the three groups (P = .7). The Ayre spatula/cotton swab is the least ex pensive device. CONCLUSION: The Ayre spatula/cotton swab was the most satisfactory of the three methods tested for obtaining cervical cytology during pregnancy. It is safe and cost-effective and identifies the same proportion of epithelial cell abnormalities as the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush and the Cell-Sweep.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the safety, efficacy and cost of three cervical cytology sampling devices in pregnant women presenting for prenatal care to the obstetrics clinic, at Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital. STUDY DESIGN: From September 7, 1993, to November 5, 1993, 61 cervical cytologic smears were obtained using the Cell-Sweep. From November 8, 1993, to January 7, 1994, 66 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush, and from January 10, 1994, to February 18, 1994, 55 smears were obtained using the Ayre spatula/cotton swab. The rate of smears with no endocervical component or with epithelial cell abnormality was determined for each group. The patients' medical records were reviewed retrospectively to determine complications occurring within two weeks of smear collection. RESULTS: Fifteen (25%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, one (1.5%) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16%) in the cotton swab group were satisfactory but limited by absence of an endocervical component (P < .0006). None of the smears were unsatisfactory. Eleven (18%) smears in the Cell-Sweep group, eight (12 %) in the Cytobrush group and nine (16 %) in the cotton swab group revealed an epithelial cell abnormality (P=.643). For all three groups there was a low rate of spontaneous abortion, preterm spontaneous rupture of membranes or preterm labor occurring within two weeks of collection. There was no statistically significant difference in these complications be tween the three groups (P = .7). The Ayre spatula/cotton swab is the least ex pensive device. CONCLUSION: The Ayre spatula/cotton swab was the most satisfactory of the three methods tested for obtaining cervical cytology during pregnancy. It is safe and cost-effective and identifies the same proportion of epithelial cell abnormalities as the Ayre spatula/Cytobrush and the Cell-Sweep.

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