Rabies

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Rabies; it is difficult to think of another disease as widely known and as universally feared. Described in the Mesopotamian “literature” over 4 millennia ago (1), its name derives from the Latin “rabio”-to rave, to be mad. This has long been recognized as a lethal disease, developing following dog bites, with rapid evolution of inexplicable terror, hallucinations, coma, and death. It is perhaps the prototypic vector borne encephalitis. It is a disease that follows one of two paths-both of which end in death. Some patients develop “furious” rabies-an encephalitic form, beginning with behavioral changes and proceeding to death on average in under a week. Others develop “dumb” or paralytic rabies, with rapidly progressive flaccid weakness, then cerebral signs, and then death-with survival approximately twice that in furious rabies. The medical literature documents six survivors (2). Remarkably, despite this long history, the pathophysiology remains enigmatic (3).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncephalitis
Subtitle of host publicationDiagnosis and Treatment
PublisherCRC Press
Pages195-205
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781420013979
ISBN (Print)9780849340314
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rabies
Hallucinations
Encephalitis
Bites and Stings
Coma
Names
Survivors
History
Dogs
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Halperin, J. (2007). Rabies. In Encephalitis: Diagnosis and Treatment (pp. 195-205). CRC Press.
Halperin, John. / Rabies. Encephalitis: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, 2007. pp. 195-205
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Halperin, J 2007, Rabies. in Encephalitis: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, pp. 195-205.

Rabies. / Halperin, John.

Encephalitis: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press, 2007. p. 195-205.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Halperin J. Rabies. In Encephalitis: Diagnosis and Treatment. CRC Press. 2007. p. 195-205