Quality of life for children with functional abdominal pain

A comparison study of patients' and parents' perceptions

Nader N. Youssef, Thomas G. Murphy, Annette L. Langseder, Joel Rosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Children with chronic abdominal pain of nonorganic origin, termed functional abdominal pain (FAP), experience school absences and social withdrawal and report impaired physical ability. The aim of this study was to assess patients' and parents' perceptions of health-related quality of life (QoL) for children with FAP. METHODS. Between October 2002 and November 2003, 209 children (including 125 girls; age: 11.2 ± 3.5 years) and 209 parents were recruited from a pediatric referral center. At the time of their initial evaluations, participants completed a validated, health-related QoL instrument (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), which was scored on a scale of 0 (poor) through 100 (best). Children with FAP (n = 65) and their families were compared with control groups of healthy children (n = 46) and children with histologically proven inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n = 42) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (n = 56). RESULTS. Children with FAP had self-reported QoL scores (score: 78) that were similar to those for children with GERD (score: 80) or IBD (score: 84). Children with FAP had lower QoL scores than did healthy children (score: 88). Parents of children with FAP reported lower QoL scores, compared with their children's scores (scores: 70 vs 78). CONCLUSIONS. Children with FAP reported lower QoL, compared with their healthy peers, and had the same QoL scores as did children with IBD or GERD. Parents' perceptions of QoL for children with FAP were lower than their children's self-reported scores. These findings highlight the clinical significance of FAP and may provide insight into one facet of the disease's biopsychosocial etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-59
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abdominal Pain
Parents
Quality of Life
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Pediatrics
Aptitude
Chronic Pain
Referral and Consultation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Youssef, Nader N. ; Murphy, Thomas G. ; Langseder, Annette L. ; Rosh, Joel. / Quality of life for children with functional abdominal pain : A comparison study of patients' and parents' perceptions. In: Pediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 54-59.
@article{f202fdf2762d49ca9f5ac931ff3bb6a9,
title = "Quality of life for children with functional abdominal pain: A comparison study of patients' and parents' perceptions",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. Children with chronic abdominal pain of nonorganic origin, termed functional abdominal pain (FAP), experience school absences and social withdrawal and report impaired physical ability. The aim of this study was to assess patients' and parents' perceptions of health-related quality of life (QoL) for children with FAP. METHODS. Between October 2002 and November 2003, 209 children (including 125 girls; age: 11.2 ± 3.5 years) and 209 parents were recruited from a pediatric referral center. At the time of their initial evaluations, participants completed a validated, health-related QoL instrument (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), which was scored on a scale of 0 (poor) through 100 (best). Children with FAP (n = 65) and their families were compared with control groups of healthy children (n = 46) and children with histologically proven inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n = 42) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (n = 56). RESULTS. Children with FAP had self-reported QoL scores (score: 78) that were similar to those for children with GERD (score: 80) or IBD (score: 84). Children with FAP had lower QoL scores than did healthy children (score: 88). Parents of children with FAP reported lower QoL scores, compared with their children's scores (scores: 70 vs 78). CONCLUSIONS. Children with FAP reported lower QoL, compared with their healthy peers, and had the same QoL scores as did children with IBD or GERD. Parents' perceptions of QoL for children with FAP were lower than their children's self-reported scores. These findings highlight the clinical significance of FAP and may provide insight into one facet of the disease's biopsychosocial etiology.",
author = "Youssef, {Nader N.} and Murphy, {Thomas G.} and Langseder, {Annette L.} and Joel Rosh",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2005-0114",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "54--59",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "1",

}

Quality of life for children with functional abdominal pain : A comparison study of patients' and parents' perceptions. / Youssef, Nader N.; Murphy, Thomas G.; Langseder, Annette L.; Rosh, Joel.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 117, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 54-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of life for children with functional abdominal pain

T2 - A comparison study of patients' and parents' perceptions

AU - Youssef, Nader N.

AU - Murphy, Thomas G.

AU - Langseder, Annette L.

AU - Rosh, Joel

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE. Children with chronic abdominal pain of nonorganic origin, termed functional abdominal pain (FAP), experience school absences and social withdrawal and report impaired physical ability. The aim of this study was to assess patients' and parents' perceptions of health-related quality of life (QoL) for children with FAP. METHODS. Between October 2002 and November 2003, 209 children (including 125 girls; age: 11.2 ± 3.5 years) and 209 parents were recruited from a pediatric referral center. At the time of their initial evaluations, participants completed a validated, health-related QoL instrument (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), which was scored on a scale of 0 (poor) through 100 (best). Children with FAP (n = 65) and their families were compared with control groups of healthy children (n = 46) and children with histologically proven inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n = 42) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (n = 56). RESULTS. Children with FAP had self-reported QoL scores (score: 78) that were similar to those for children with GERD (score: 80) or IBD (score: 84). Children with FAP had lower QoL scores than did healthy children (score: 88). Parents of children with FAP reported lower QoL scores, compared with their children's scores (scores: 70 vs 78). CONCLUSIONS. Children with FAP reported lower QoL, compared with their healthy peers, and had the same QoL scores as did children with IBD or GERD. Parents' perceptions of QoL for children with FAP were lower than their children's self-reported scores. These findings highlight the clinical significance of FAP and may provide insight into one facet of the disease's biopsychosocial etiology.

AB - OBJECTIVE. Children with chronic abdominal pain of nonorganic origin, termed functional abdominal pain (FAP), experience school absences and social withdrawal and report impaired physical ability. The aim of this study was to assess patients' and parents' perceptions of health-related quality of life (QoL) for children with FAP. METHODS. Between October 2002 and November 2003, 209 children (including 125 girls; age: 11.2 ± 3.5 years) and 209 parents were recruited from a pediatric referral center. At the time of their initial evaluations, participants completed a validated, health-related QoL instrument (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), which was scored on a scale of 0 (poor) through 100 (best). Children with FAP (n = 65) and their families were compared with control groups of healthy children (n = 46) and children with histologically proven inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n = 42) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (n = 56). RESULTS. Children with FAP had self-reported QoL scores (score: 78) that were similar to those for children with GERD (score: 80) or IBD (score: 84). Children with FAP had lower QoL scores than did healthy children (score: 88). Parents of children with FAP reported lower QoL scores, compared with their children's scores (scores: 70 vs 78). CONCLUSIONS. Children with FAP reported lower QoL, compared with their healthy peers, and had the same QoL scores as did children with IBD or GERD. Parents' perceptions of QoL for children with FAP were lower than their children's self-reported scores. These findings highlight the clinical significance of FAP and may provide insight into one facet of the disease's biopsychosocial etiology.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33644836013&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33644836013&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2005-0114

DO - 10.1542/peds.2005-0114

M3 - Article

VL - 117

SP - 54

EP - 59

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 1

ER -