Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma

Enrique Hernandez, David DeFilippis, Kathy O'Connell, Gulnar Balsara, Shazneen Keyamanesh, Lisa Anderson, Paul Heller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that there are two types of endometrial carcinoma: the first arises in younger women who have hyperestrogenism and has a favorable prognosis and the second occurs in older women, is not associated to estrogen stimulation, and has a poorer prognosis. This study examined the hypothesis that more aggressive carcinomas are found in older patients with no evidence of estrogen stimulation. A retrospective review of all patients (N=82) with endometrial carcinoma diagnosed and treated at our institution between 1978 and 1990 was undertaken. The following data were analyzed: age at diagnosis, stage, race, histologiv type, grade, depth of myometrial invasion, absence or presence of associated hyperplasia, and survival. The mean age of the patients was 64.8 years. Sixty (73%) of the 82 patients were considered estrogen-positive either because of obesity (body mass index ≥27.3) or the use of unopposed exogenous estrogen.There were no statistically significant differences between estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative patients. Patients ≥65 years had a 5-year survival of 60% compared with 74% for younger patients. There was a trend toward higher histologic grade among the older patients. Otherwise no statistically significant differences were found between these two groups. Estrogen-negative women ≥65 years had the worst prognosis with a 5-year survival of 29%. As identified by other investigators, age at diagnosis is a significant indicator of prognosis in patients with endometrial carcinoma. In this series, thin, older (≥65 years) women who developed endometrial carcinoma had the worst prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-111
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume88
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1996

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Adenocarcinoma
Estrogens
Endometrial Neoplasms
Survival
Hyperplasia
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Research Personnel
Carcinoma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hernandez, E., DeFilippis, D., O'Connell, K., Balsara, G., Keyamanesh, S., Anderson, L., & Heller, P. (1996). Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma. Journal of the National Medical Association, 88(2), 107-111.
Hernandez, Enrique ; DeFilippis, David ; O'Connell, Kathy ; Balsara, Gulnar ; Keyamanesh, Shazneen ; Anderson, Lisa ; Heller, Paul. / Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 1996 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 107-111.
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Hernandez, E, DeFilippis, D, O'Connell, K, Balsara, G, Keyamanesh, S, Anderson, L & Heller, P 1996, 'Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma', Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 107-111.

Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma. / Hernandez, Enrique; DeFilippis, David; O'Connell, Kathy; Balsara, Gulnar; Keyamanesh, Shazneen; Anderson, Lisa; Heller, Paul.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 88, No. 2, 01.02.1996, p. 107-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Hernandez E, DeFilippis D, O'Connell K, Balsara G, Keyamanesh S, Anderson L et al. Poorer prognosis in older patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma. Journal of the National Medical Association. 1996 Feb 1;88(2):107-111.