Oral Corticosteroids and the Treatment of NFL players: A Survey of Team Physicians

Andrew Tucker, Damion Martins, Michael Yorio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose of review: Oral corticosteroids are used frequently in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries without a solid evidence-based indication or specific guidance on dose and duration of therapy. The use of oral corticosteroids in sports medicine is based on their strong antiinflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into how the team physicians for the National Football League use oral corticosteroids in the care of professional football players.

Recent findings: Of the team physicians surveyed, 83.9% occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in their general practice, and the same percentage occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in treating professional football players. The most common indication for the use of oral corticosteroid therapy by the team physicians is intervertebral disc herniations. The most common oral corticosteroid used was methylprednisolone at a starting dose of 12–24 mg (61.3%), and the most common duration of therapy selected was 7 days (77.4%). Of the team physicians, 25.8% reported that they have observed a serious complication in their careers, and most these complications were avascular necrosis. Of the team physicians surveyed, 90.3% stated that their opinion of the short-term use of oral corticosteroids in elite athletes is safe and effective.

Summary: This survey perhaps allows a starting point for further research with which we may begin to formulate a safety profile to assist team physicians on the use of these drugs and be better able to educate the athletes whom we treat on the relative risk of this class of medications. Prospective studies are needed to more adequately evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108
Number of pages112
JournalCurrent Orthopaedic Practice
Volume15
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Physicians
Football
Therapeutics
Athletes
Safety
Sports Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Intervertebral Disc
Methylprednisolone
General Practice
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Necrosis
Prospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

@article{01b7926714694858bfd60fd907ab4c94,
title = "Oral Corticosteroids and the Treatment of NFL players: A Survey of Team Physicians",
abstract = "Purpose of review: Oral corticosteroids are used frequently in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries without a solid evidence-based indication or specific guidance on dose and duration of therapy. The use of oral corticosteroids in sports medicine is based on their strong antiinflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into how the team physicians for the National Football League use oral corticosteroids in the care of professional football players.Recent findings: Of the team physicians surveyed, 83.9{\%} occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in their general practice, and the same percentage occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in treating professional football players. The most common indication for the use of oral corticosteroid therapy by the team physicians is intervertebral disc herniations. The most common oral corticosteroid used was methylprednisolone at a starting dose of 12–24 mg (61.3{\%}), and the most common duration of therapy selected was 7 days (77.4{\%}). Of the team physicians, 25.8{\%} reported that they have observed a serious complication in their careers, and most these complications were avascular necrosis. Of the team physicians surveyed, 90.3{\%} stated that their opinion of the short-term use of oral corticosteroids in elite athletes is safe and effective.Summary: This survey perhaps allows a starting point for further research with which we may begin to formulate a safety profile to assist team physicians on the use of these drugs and be better able to educate the athletes whom we treat on the relative risk of this class of medications. Prospective studies are needed to more adequately evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents.",
author = "Andrew Tucker and Damion Martins and Michael Yorio",
year = "2004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "108",
journal = "Current Orthopaedic Practice",
issn = "1940-7041",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

Oral Corticosteroids and the Treatment of NFL players: A Survey of Team Physicians. / Tucker, Andrew; Martins, Damion; Yorio, Michael.

In: Current Orthopaedic Practice, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2004, p. 108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral Corticosteroids and the Treatment of NFL players: A Survey of Team Physicians

AU - Tucker, Andrew

AU - Martins, Damion

AU - Yorio, Michael

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Purpose of review: Oral corticosteroids are used frequently in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries without a solid evidence-based indication or specific guidance on dose and duration of therapy. The use of oral corticosteroids in sports medicine is based on their strong antiinflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into how the team physicians for the National Football League use oral corticosteroids in the care of professional football players.Recent findings: Of the team physicians surveyed, 83.9% occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in their general practice, and the same percentage occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in treating professional football players. The most common indication for the use of oral corticosteroid therapy by the team physicians is intervertebral disc herniations. The most common oral corticosteroid used was methylprednisolone at a starting dose of 12–24 mg (61.3%), and the most common duration of therapy selected was 7 days (77.4%). Of the team physicians, 25.8% reported that they have observed a serious complication in their careers, and most these complications were avascular necrosis. Of the team physicians surveyed, 90.3% stated that their opinion of the short-term use of oral corticosteroids in elite athletes is safe and effective.Summary: This survey perhaps allows a starting point for further research with which we may begin to formulate a safety profile to assist team physicians on the use of these drugs and be better able to educate the athletes whom we treat on the relative risk of this class of medications. Prospective studies are needed to more adequately evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents.

AB - Purpose of review: Oral corticosteroids are used frequently in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries without a solid evidence-based indication or specific guidance on dose and duration of therapy. The use of oral corticosteroids in sports medicine is based on their strong antiinflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into how the team physicians for the National Football League use oral corticosteroids in the care of professional football players.Recent findings: Of the team physicians surveyed, 83.9% occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in their general practice, and the same percentage occasionally prescribe oral corticosteroids in treating professional football players. The most common indication for the use of oral corticosteroid therapy by the team physicians is intervertebral disc herniations. The most common oral corticosteroid used was methylprednisolone at a starting dose of 12–24 mg (61.3%), and the most common duration of therapy selected was 7 days (77.4%). Of the team physicians, 25.8% reported that they have observed a serious complication in their careers, and most these complications were avascular necrosis. Of the team physicians surveyed, 90.3% stated that their opinion of the short-term use of oral corticosteroids in elite athletes is safe and effective.Summary: This survey perhaps allows a starting point for further research with which we may begin to formulate a safety profile to assist team physicians on the use of these drugs and be better able to educate the athletes whom we treat on the relative risk of this class of medications. Prospective studies are needed to more adequately evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents.

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 108

JO - Current Orthopaedic Practice

JF - Current Orthopaedic Practice

SN - 1940-7041

IS - 2

ER -