Occult subacute thyroiditis mimicking classic giant cell arteritis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report the case of a 60‐year‐old man who presented with fever, weight loss, generalized aching, left temporal and ear pain, and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 125 mm/hour. Due to the presumed diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), the patient was treated with prednisone (60 mg daily), with immediate improvement in his symptoms. Biopsy of the temporal arteries revealed no significant inflammatory infiltrate. Further evaluation included assessments of thyroid function, which revealed an elevated T4 level, low thyroid‐stimulating hormone level, and suppressed radioactive iodine uptake on thyroid scintigraphy. A diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis was made, prednisone therapy was tapered over 3 weeks, and treatment with beta blockers was instituted. The patient remained asymptomatic and returned to a euthyroid state. This case illustrates that subacute thyroiditis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of GCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1618-1620
Number of pages3
JournalArthritis & Rheumatism
Volume37
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Subacute Thyroiditis
Giant Cell Arteritis
Prednisone
Thyroid Gland
Temporal Arteries
Blood Sedimentation
Radionuclide Imaging
Iodine
Ear
Weight Loss
Differential Diagnosis
Fever
Hormones
Biopsy
Pain
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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Occult subacute thyroiditis mimicking classic giant cell arteritis. / Rosenstein, Elliot; Kramer, Neil.

In: Arthritis & Rheumatism, Vol. 37, No. 11, 01.01.1994, p. 1618-1620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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