Nutritional approaches to epilepsy

Jeffrey Politsky, Yelena Karbinovskaya

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Epilepsy is defined as “any group of syndromes characterized by paroxysmal transient disturbances of brain function that may be manifested as episodic impairment or loss of consciousness, abnormal motor phenomena, psychic or sensory disturbances, or perturbation of the autonomic nervous system due to electrical activity disturbances in the brain.” There are about 40 different types of epileptic syndromes and about 200 different types of seizures. Epilepsy as a disease has existed since ancient times, with the Greeks having some of the earliest reports of “the falling sickness.” Dietary treatment for epilepsy has also been considered a prominent therapy since the earliest mentions of epilepsy. Many “treatments” were considered for epilepsy, which included a decrease or increase in consumption of certain foods. Hippocrates was one of the first to report fasting as a method to stop a seizure. Aristotle believed that food formed an evaporated material in the veins that would rise upward, turn around, and descend. He believed that if too much evaporated material is carried up into the veins, the veins will swell and compress the respiratory center causing convulsions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMetabolic Medicine and Surgery
PublisherCRC Press
Pages529-548
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781466567122
ISBN (Print)9781466567115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Epilepsy
Veins
Seizures
Respiratory Center
Food
Unconsciousness
Autonomic Nervous System
Brain
Fasting
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Politsky, J., & Karbinovskaya, Y. (2014). Nutritional approaches to epilepsy. In Metabolic Medicine and Surgery (pp. 529-548). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616
Politsky, Jeffrey ; Karbinovskaya, Yelena. / Nutritional approaches to epilepsy. Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, 2014. pp. 529-548
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Politsky, J & Karbinovskaya, Y 2014, Nutritional approaches to epilepsy. in Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, pp. 529-548. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616

Nutritional approaches to epilepsy. / Politsky, Jeffrey; Karbinovskaya, Yelena.

Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, 2014. p. 529-548.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Politsky J, Karbinovskaya Y. Nutritional approaches to epilepsy. In Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press. 2014. p. 529-548 https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616