North American Lyme neuroborreliosis.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical, neurophysiologic and laboratory findings obtained in American patients with nervous system Lyme borreliosis were compared to published observations in European neuroborreliosis patients. In both populations, Borrelia burgdorferi infection is commonly associated with neurologic abnormalities. European reports have emphasized dramatic clinical phenomena, such as painful radiculitis (Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth syndrome) and chronic progressive spastic paraparesis. North American patients seem to develop milder forms of nervous system involvement. Peripheral nervous system manifestations take a variety of forms, ranging from mild, intermittent sensory symptoms, to typical painful radiculitis. Despite the range of clinical presentations, neurophysiologic and morphologic analyses indicate these all represent different manifestations of the same pathophysiologic process, which, in turn, is similar to what has been described in Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth syndrome. Similarly, central nervous system (CNS) symptoms vary widely, ranging from a mild confusional state to a severe encephalitis. The encephalitis is probably due to direct CNS infection. In some instances the confusional state may also be due to CNS infection but it is likely that in many patients it is not. As in European patients, the most reliable indicator of CNS infection appears to be the intrathecal production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies. Although North American Lyme borreliosis patients may often develop milder forms of nervous system involvement that their European counterparts, there is considerable overlap, and the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are probably identical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-80
Number of pages7
JournalScandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, Supplement
Volume77
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Central Nervous System Infections
Confusion
Radiculopathy
Encephalitis
Nervous System
Borrelia Infections
Spastic Paraparesis
Nervous System Malformations
Paraparesis
Borrelia burgdorferi
Lyme Disease
Peripheral Nervous System
Central Nervous System
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "North American Lyme neuroborreliosis.",
abstract = "Clinical, neurophysiologic and laboratory findings obtained in American patients with nervous system Lyme borreliosis were compared to published observations in European neuroborreliosis patients. In both populations, Borrelia burgdorferi infection is commonly associated with neurologic abnormalities. European reports have emphasized dramatic clinical phenomena, such as painful radiculitis (Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth syndrome) and chronic progressive spastic paraparesis. North American patients seem to develop milder forms of nervous system involvement. Peripheral nervous system manifestations take a variety of forms, ranging from mild, intermittent sensory symptoms, to typical painful radiculitis. Despite the range of clinical presentations, neurophysiologic and morphologic analyses indicate these all represent different manifestations of the same pathophysiologic process, which, in turn, is similar to what has been described in Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth syndrome. Similarly, central nervous system (CNS) symptoms vary widely, ranging from a mild confusional state to a severe encephalitis. The encephalitis is probably due to direct CNS infection. In some instances the confusional state may also be due to CNS infection but it is likely that in many patients it is not. As in European patients, the most reliable indicator of CNS infection appears to be the intrathecal production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies. Although North American Lyme borreliosis patients may often develop milder forms of nervous system involvement that their European counterparts, there is considerable overlap, and the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are probably identical.",
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North American Lyme neuroborreliosis. / Halperin, John.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, Supplement, Vol. 77, 01.01.1991, p. 74-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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