Nonconvulsive Epileptiform Activity Appearing as Ataxia

Harvey S. Bennett, Jay E. Selman, Isabelle Rapin, Arthur Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ataxia may be the result of otherwise silent epileptiform activity. We studied three patients, between 3 and 5 years of age, whose initial complaint was unsteadiness of gait. Each one of the patients had an epileptiform EEG with bursts of slow spike and wave activity. Each had normal results of diagnostic studies for other causes of ataxia. Specifically, none had anticonvulsant drug levels in the toxic range. Modification of the anticonvulsant regimen resulted in dramatic clinical and EEG improvement. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity has been called pseudoataxia in the scant literature on this subject. This process should be considered in the evaluation of ataxia in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-32
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume136
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Ataxia
Anticonvulsants
Electroencephalography
Poisons
Gait

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Bennett, Harvey S. ; Selman, Jay E. ; Rapin, Isabelle ; Rose, Arthur. / Nonconvulsive Epileptiform Activity Appearing as Ataxia. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1982 ; Vol. 136, No. 1. pp. 30-32.
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Nonconvulsive Epileptiform Activity Appearing as Ataxia. / Bennett, Harvey S.; Selman, Jay E.; Rapin, Isabelle; Rose, Arthur.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 136, No. 1, 01.01.1982, p. 30-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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