Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10% to 15% of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-366
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Infectious Disease Reports
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Neurologic Manifestations
Lyme Disease
Borrelia Infections
Mononeuropathies
Neuritis
Borrelia burgdorferi
Ticks
Encephalitis
Meningitis
Spinal Cord

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{1e53daf3329c4a3bacccfc2ad2e1391b,
title = "Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease",
abstract = "Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10{\%} to 15{\%} of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.",
author = "John Halperin",
year = "2011",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11908-011-0184-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "360--366",
journal = "Current Infectious Disease Reports",
issn = "1523-3847",
publisher = "Current Science, Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease. / Halperin, John.

In: Current Infectious Disease Reports, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.08.2011, p. 360-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease

AU - Halperin, John

PY - 2011/8/1

Y1 - 2011/8/1

N2 - Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10% to 15% of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.

AB - Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10% to 15% of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052631031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052631031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11908-011-0184-x

DO - 10.1007/s11908-011-0184-x

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 360

EP - 366

JO - Current Infectious Disease Reports

JF - Current Infectious Disease Reports

SN - 1523-3847

IS - 4

ER -