Neuroborreliosis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurologic manifestations of nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii are qualitatively similar, and include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and other focal or multifocal mononeuropathies. Parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) infection occurs rarely. Neurobehavioral changes are common, but are rarely evidence of CNS infection. Diagnosis requires likely exposure and a finding with high diagnostic positive predictive value, specifically erythema migrans, or laboratory support, typically positive 2-tiered serologic testing. CNS infection is often evidenced by a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and intrathecal production of specific antibody.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-830
Number of pages10
JournalNeurologic Clinics
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Central Nervous System Infections
Borrelia burgdorferi Group
Mononeuropathies
Neuritis
Borrelia burgdorferi
Leukocytosis
Erythema
Neurologic Manifestations
Meningitis
Nervous System
Antibody Formation
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Halperin, John J. / Neuroborreliosis. In: Neurologic Clinics. 2018 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 821-830.
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Neuroborreliosis. / Halperin, John J.

In: Neurologic Clinics, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.11.2018, p. 821-830.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Neuroborreliosis

AU - Halperin, John J.

PY - 2018/11/1

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AB - Neurologic manifestations of nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii are qualitatively similar, and include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and other focal or multifocal mononeuropathies. Parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) infection occurs rarely. Neurobehavioral changes are common, but are rarely evidence of CNS infection. Diagnosis requires likely exposure and a finding with high diagnostic positive predictive value, specifically erythema migrans, or laboratory support, typically positive 2-tiered serologic testing. CNS infection is often evidenced by a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and intrathecal production of specific antibody.

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