Neuroborreliosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Appropriate, critical application of evidence-based diagnostic criteria enables both a clear definition of what constitutes neuroborreliosis—nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto in the US, B garinii and less commonly B. afzelii and other species in Europe—and recognition that this disorder is quite similar in Europe and the US. Most commonly evidenced by lymphocytic meningitis and/or multifocal inflammation of the peripheral (common; cranial neuropathy, radiculopathy, mononeuropathy multiplex) or central (rare) nervous system, it is readily diagnosed and highly antibiotic responsive. Encephalopathy—altered cognition or memory—can occur as part of the systemic infection and inflammatory state, but is not evidence of neuroborreliosis. Post treatment Lyme disease syndrome—persistent neurobehavioral symptoms 6 months or more after usually curative antibiotic treatment—if real and not simply an example of anchoring bias—is unrelated to neuroborreliosis. The pathophysiology of neuroborreliosis remains unclear, but appears to involve both a requirement for viable micro-organisms and significant immune amplification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1292-1297
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume264
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Mononeuropathies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Cranial Nerve Diseases
Borrelia burgdorferi
Radiculopathy
Lyme Disease
Infection
Meningitis
Cognition
Central Nervous System
Inflammation
Recognition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Halperin, John. / Neuroborreliosis. In: Journal of Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 264, No. 6. pp. 1292-1297.
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Neuroborreliosis. / Halperin, John.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 264, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1292-1297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Halperin, John

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