Nervous system Lyme disease: Is there a controversy?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infection with the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, affects the nervous system in well-defined ways. Accurate diagnostic tools and effective therapeutic regimens are now well established. Persistent misconceptions about (1) the role and interpretation of laboratory tests, (2) what is and is not evidence of nervous system infection, and (3) what constitutes an expected response to treatment have fostered widespread perceptions that this disease is highly controversial. Infection causes the classically described triad of meningitis, radiculoneuritis, and cranial neuritis; however, virtually every known neurologic disorder has been blamed on this infection. For most (multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease), evidence is scant, nonexistent, or coincidental. For some (cerebral vasculitis with stroke, optic neuritis) a few case reports suggest a rare possible causal link.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-324
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Neurology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 11 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Nervous System
Infection
Central Nervous System Vasculitis
Tick-Borne Diseases
Neuritis
Optic Neuritis
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Nervous System Diseases
Meningitis
Multiple Sclerosis
Parkinson Disease
Alzheimer Disease
Stroke
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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Nervous system Lyme disease : Is there a controversy? / Halperin, John J.

In: Seminars in Neurology, Vol. 31, No. 3, 11.10.2011, p. 317-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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