Nervous system lyme disease: Diagnosis and treatment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tickborne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, frequently affects the peripheral and central nervous systems. The earliest indication of Lyme disease infection is usually erythema migrans. This large, typically macular erythema, often with a target-like pattern of concentric pale and red circles, gradually enlarges day by day, potentially reaching many centimeters in diameter. In a significant proportion of infected individuals, an acute disseminated phase leads to seeding elsewhere in the body. Up to 5% of patients develop cardiac involvement. In about 10% to 15% of patients, the nervous system becomes sympto-matically involved. Current serologic diagnostic tools are quite useful, and standard treatment regimens are highly effective. Oral antimicrobials have been shown to be effective in European neuroborreliosis and presumably are equally potent in North American patients. Long-term antibiotic treatment does not provide any additional lasting improvement, but it is frequently associated with significant morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-12
Number of pages9
JournalReviews in Neurological Diseases
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Lyme Disease
Erythema
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Peripheral Nervous System
Nervous System
Communicable Diseases
Therapeutics
Central Nervous System
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tickborne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, frequently affects the peripheral and central nervous systems. The earliest indication of Lyme disease infection is usually erythema migrans. This large, typically macular erythema, often with a target-like pattern of concentric pale and red circles, gradually enlarges day by day, potentially reaching many centimeters in diameter. In a significant proportion of infected individuals, an acute disseminated phase leads to seeding elsewhere in the body. Up to 5{\%} of patients develop cardiac involvement. In about 10{\%} to 15{\%} of patients, the nervous system becomes sympto-matically involved. Current serologic diagnostic tools are quite useful, and standard treatment regimens are highly effective. Oral antimicrobials have been shown to be effective in European neuroborreliosis and presumably are equally potent in North American patients. Long-term antibiotic treatment does not provide any additional lasting improvement, but it is frequently associated with significant morbidity.",
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Nervous system lyme disease : Diagnosis and treatment. / Halperin, John J.

In: Reviews in Neurological Diseases, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 4-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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