Nervous system Lyme disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi involves the nervous system in 10-15% of affected individuals. Manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and mononeuropathy multiplex. Encephalopathy, identical to that seen in many systemic inflammatory diseases, can occur during active systemic infection. It is not specific to Lyme disease and only rarely is evidence of nervous system infection. Diagnosis of systemic disease is based on demonstration of specific antibodies in peripheral blood by means of two-tier testing with an ELISA and Western blot. Central nervous system infection often results in specific antibody production in the CSF, demonstrable by comparing spinal fluid to blood serologies. Treatment is straightforward and curative in most instances. Many patients can be treated effectively with oral antibiotics such as doxycycline; in severe CNS infection parenteral treatment with ceftriaxone or other similar agents is highly effective. Treatment should usually be for 2 to at most 4 weeks. Longer treatment adds no therapeutic benefit but does add substantial risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Clinical Neurology
PublisherElsevier B.V.
Pages1473-1483
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameHandbook of Clinical Neurology
Volume121
ISSN (Print)0072-9752

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Lyme Disease
Nervous System
Infection
Mononeuropathies
Therapeutics
Neuritis
Central Nervous System Infections
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Ceftriaxone
Doxycycline
Brain Diseases
Ticks
Serology
Meningitis
Antibody Formation
Communicable Diseases
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Halperin, J. (2014). Nervous system Lyme disease. In Handbook of Clinical Neurology (pp. 1473-1483). (Handbook of Clinical Neurology; Vol. 121). Elsevier B.V.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-7020-4088-7.00099-7
Halperin, John. / Nervous system Lyme disease. Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Elsevier B.V., 2014. pp. 1473-1483 (Handbook of Clinical Neurology).
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Halperin, J 2014, Nervous system Lyme disease. in Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 121, Elsevier B.V., pp. 1473-1483. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-7020-4088-7.00099-7

Nervous system Lyme disease. / Halperin, John.

Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Elsevier B.V., 2014. p. 1473-1483 (Handbook of Clinical Neurology; Vol. 121).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Halperin J. Nervous system Lyme disease. In Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Elsevier B.V. 2014. p. 1473-1483. (Handbook of Clinical Neurology). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-7020-4088-7.00099-7