Nervous system lyme disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease, the multi-system infection caused by the tick-borne spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, can involve the nervous system, most commonly causing, alone or in combination, lymphocytic meningitis or abnormalities of cranial or peripheral nerves, the latter most typically presenting as a painful radicular syndrome. Diagnosis is based on appropriately used, standard serological tests; in instances where the central nervous system is involved, cerebrospinal fluid assessment for organism-specific antibodies can be useful. Treatment with any of several standard regimens of oral or parenteral antimicrobials is highly effective. Prolonged treatment beyond four weeks is rarely if ever warranted, and carries significant risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-255
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "Lyme disease, the multi-system infection caused by the tick-borne spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, can involve the nervous system, most commonly causing, alone or in combination, lymphocytic meningitis or abnormalities of cranial or peripheral nerves, the latter most typically presenting as a painful radicular syndrome. Diagnosis is based on appropriately used, standard serological tests; in instances where the central nervous system is involved, cerebrospinal fluid assessment for organism-specific antibodies can be useful. Treatment with any of several standard regimens of oral or parenteral antimicrobials is highly effective. Prolonged treatment beyond four weeks is rarely if ever warranted, and carries significant risk.",
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Nervous system lyme disease. / Halperin, John.

In: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, Vol. 40, No. 3, 08.10.2010, p. 248-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Halperin, John

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AB - Lyme disease, the multi-system infection caused by the tick-borne spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, can involve the nervous system, most commonly causing, alone or in combination, lymphocytic meningitis or abnormalities of cranial or peripheral nerves, the latter most typically presenting as a painful radicular syndrome. Diagnosis is based on appropriately used, standard serological tests; in instances where the central nervous system is involved, cerebrospinal fluid assessment for organism-specific antibodies can be useful. Treatment with any of several standard regimens of oral or parenteral antimicrobials is highly effective. Prolonged treatment beyond four weeks is rarely if ever warranted, and carries significant risk.

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