Nervous system Lyme disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi group. The disease occurs primarily in specific areas of North America, Europe and Asia, reflecting the distribution of the hard-shelled lxodes ticks that are required for disease transmission. Diagnosis of this infection can be somewhat problematic, although in clinically appropriate settings, serologic testing can be highly useful, particularly if Western blots are used to confirm borderline or positive results. The organism has several specific organotropisms- involvement of the heart, joints and nervous system being particularly common. The nervous system can be involved in one or more ways. Early in infection, patients tend to get a lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis (particularly the facial nerves) or a painful radiculitis. Rarely, an encephalomyelitis can occur. In patients with more protracted and indolent involvement, a more disseminated mononeuropathy multiplex may occur, or a mild, non-focal alteration of cognitive function and memory, i.e. an encephalopathy. In patients with central nervous system involvement, the most sensitive diagnostic test is the demonstration of intrathecal production of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibody. Culture, polymerase chain reaction and other techniques appear to be less specific. In most instances, the disease is quite responsive to antimicrobial therapy. Oral treatment with doxycycline has been shown to be effective in meningitis. In more serious cases two to four week courses of parenteral ceffriaxone or cefotaxime are effective in the vast majority of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-191
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume153
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 8 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Ticks
Meningitis
Nervous System
Northern Asia
Borrelia burgdorferi Group
Mononeuropathies
Encephalomyelitis
Neuritis
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Radiculopathy
Cefotaxime
Lyme Disease
Doxycycline
Facial Nerve
Brain Diseases
North America
Infection
Routine Diagnostic Tests

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{3c25902f19ff421f8a1157c1ab79098a,
title = "Nervous system Lyme disease",
abstract = "Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi group. The disease occurs primarily in specific areas of North America, Europe and Asia, reflecting the distribution of the hard-shelled lxodes ticks that are required for disease transmission. Diagnosis of this infection can be somewhat problematic, although in clinically appropriate settings, serologic testing can be highly useful, particularly if Western blots are used to confirm borderline or positive results. The organism has several specific organotropisms- involvement of the heart, joints and nervous system being particularly common. The nervous system can be involved in one or more ways. Early in infection, patients tend to get a lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis (particularly the facial nerves) or a painful radiculitis. Rarely, an encephalomyelitis can occur. In patients with more protracted and indolent involvement, a more disseminated mononeuropathy multiplex may occur, or a mild, non-focal alteration of cognitive function and memory, i.e. an encephalopathy. In patients with central nervous system involvement, the most sensitive diagnostic test is the demonstration of intrathecal production of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibody. Culture, polymerase chain reaction and other techniques appear to be less specific. In most instances, the disease is quite responsive to antimicrobial therapy. Oral treatment with doxycycline has been shown to be effective in meningitis. In more serious cases two to four week courses of parenteral ceffriaxone or cefotaxime are effective in the vast majority of patients.",
author = "Halperin, {John J.}",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-510X(97)00290-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "153",
pages = "182--191",
journal = "Journal of the Neurological Sciences",
issn = "0022-510X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

Nervous system Lyme disease. / Halperin, John J.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 153, No. 2, 08.01.1998, p. 182-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nervous system Lyme disease

AU - Halperin, John J.

PY - 1998/1/8

Y1 - 1998/1/8

N2 - Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi group. The disease occurs primarily in specific areas of North America, Europe and Asia, reflecting the distribution of the hard-shelled lxodes ticks that are required for disease transmission. Diagnosis of this infection can be somewhat problematic, although in clinically appropriate settings, serologic testing can be highly useful, particularly if Western blots are used to confirm borderline or positive results. The organism has several specific organotropisms- involvement of the heart, joints and nervous system being particularly common. The nervous system can be involved in one or more ways. Early in infection, patients tend to get a lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis (particularly the facial nerves) or a painful radiculitis. Rarely, an encephalomyelitis can occur. In patients with more protracted and indolent involvement, a more disseminated mononeuropathy multiplex may occur, or a mild, non-focal alteration of cognitive function and memory, i.e. an encephalopathy. In patients with central nervous system involvement, the most sensitive diagnostic test is the demonstration of intrathecal production of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibody. Culture, polymerase chain reaction and other techniques appear to be less specific. In most instances, the disease is quite responsive to antimicrobial therapy. Oral treatment with doxycycline has been shown to be effective in meningitis. In more serious cases two to four week courses of parenteral ceffriaxone or cefotaxime are effective in the vast majority of patients.

AB - Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi group. The disease occurs primarily in specific areas of North America, Europe and Asia, reflecting the distribution of the hard-shelled lxodes ticks that are required for disease transmission. Diagnosis of this infection can be somewhat problematic, although in clinically appropriate settings, serologic testing can be highly useful, particularly if Western blots are used to confirm borderline or positive results. The organism has several specific organotropisms- involvement of the heart, joints and nervous system being particularly common. The nervous system can be involved in one or more ways. Early in infection, patients tend to get a lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis (particularly the facial nerves) or a painful radiculitis. Rarely, an encephalomyelitis can occur. In patients with more protracted and indolent involvement, a more disseminated mononeuropathy multiplex may occur, or a mild, non-focal alteration of cognitive function and memory, i.e. an encephalopathy. In patients with central nervous system involvement, the most sensitive diagnostic test is the demonstration of intrathecal production of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibody. Culture, polymerase chain reaction and other techniques appear to be less specific. In most instances, the disease is quite responsive to antimicrobial therapy. Oral treatment with doxycycline has been shown to be effective in meningitis. In more serious cases two to four week courses of parenteral ceffriaxone or cefotaxime are effective in the vast majority of patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032495510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032495510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-510X(97)00290-6

DO - 10.1016/S0022-510X(97)00290-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 9511877

AN - SCOPUS:0032495510

VL - 153

SP - 182

EP - 191

JO - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

JF - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

SN - 0022-510X

IS - 2

ER -