Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery

Olga A. Melzer, Michael Rothkopf

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

With the rising epidemic of obesity in the United States, bariatric surgery has become a valuable option to achieve sustained weight loss and decrease the burden of metabolic comorbidities, such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia. It is recommended for patients with BMI > 40 kg/m2 and BMI > 35 kg/m2 with comorbidities related to obesity [1]. More than 100,000 weight loss procedures are performed annually in the United States [2]. Advancements in the surgical techniques resulted in the lowering of overall mortality rates in the immediate postoperative period [3]. However, as postoperative time elapses, the risks of nutritional deficiencies increase, especially in patients without close metabolic monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMetabolic Medicine and Surgery
PublisherCRC Press
Pages349-372
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781466567122
ISBN (Print)9781466567115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Bariatric Surgery
Micronutrients
Brain Diseases
Comorbidity
Weight Loss
Obesity
Hyperlipidemias
Postoperative Period
Malnutrition
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Melzer, O. A., & Rothkopf, M. (2014). Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. In Metabolic Medicine and Surgery (pp. 349-372). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616
Melzer, Olga A. ; Rothkopf, Michael. / Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, 2014. pp. 349-372
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Melzer, OA & Rothkopf, M 2014, Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. in Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, pp. 349-372. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616

Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. / Melzer, Olga A.; Rothkopf, Michael.

Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press, 2014. p. 349-372.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Melzer OA, Rothkopf M. Micronutrient-deficient encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. In Metabolic Medicine and Surgery. CRC Press. 2014. p. 349-372 https://doi.org/10.1201/b17616