Methotrexate

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Pharmacologic therapy for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can consist of topical therapies as well as those therapies that exert a direct effect on the host immune system. Traditionally, thiopurines have been the first line immunomodulatory agents used to treat pediatric IBD. Increasing awareness of rare but potentially life-threatening malignancies that have been associated with thiopurine use as well as cases of intolerance or lack of response to thiopurine agents has served to promote increasing utilization of another immunomodulator, methotrexate. Given once a week, either parenterally or orally, methotrexate has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric Crohn' disease with less proven efficacy in pediatric ulcerative colitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages339-343
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781461450610
ISBN (Print)9781461450603
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Methotrexate
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Pediatrics
Immunologic Factors
Immune System
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Pediatric Crohn's disease
Pediatric ulcerative colitis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rosh, J. (2013). Methotrexate. In Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition (pp. 339-343). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5061-0_32
Rosh, Joel. / Methotrexate. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition. Springer New York, 2013. pp. 339-343
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Rosh, J 2013, Methotrexate. in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition. Springer New York, pp. 339-343. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5061-0_32

Methotrexate. / Rosh, Joel.

Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition. Springer New York, 2013. p. 339-343.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Rosh J. Methotrexate. In Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Second Edition. Springer New York. 2013. p. 339-343 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5061-0_32