Metastases involving spinal cord, roots, and plexus

Kurt Jaeckle

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurogenic pain is common in patients with widespread metastatic cancer. Pain of this type is often severe and typically results from neoplastic invasion of the peripheral nerves, spinal roots, or spinal cord. Tumors may invade the cervical, brachial, or lumbosacral plexuses either by direct extension from contiguous structures or in association with metastases to regional soft tissues and lymph nodes. Most of these patients experience progressive pain, motor loss, and sensory dysfunction. Metastases directly to the peripheral nerves are rare in patients with solid tumors but are more frequently encountered in patients with hematologic malignancies. Metastases to the spinal roots and the spinal cord usually occur in patients who also have demonstrable evidence of leptomeningeal or intraparenchymal brain metastases. These conditions may overlap and must be distinguished from other causes of plexus, nerve, or spinal cord disorders in the patient with cancer. Early identification and appropriate treatment allow these patients to remain functional and interactive with family and friends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)855-871
Number of pages17
JournalCONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Spinal Nerve Roots
Spinal Cord
Neoplasm Metastasis
Peripheral Nerves
Pain
Neoplasms
Cervical Plexus
Lumbosacral Plexus
Brachial Plexus
Spinal Cord Diseases
Hematologic Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Neurogenic pain is common in patients with widespread metastatic cancer. Pain of this type is often severe and typically results from neoplastic invasion of the peripheral nerves, spinal roots, or spinal cord. Tumors may invade the cervical, brachial, or lumbosacral plexuses either by direct extension from contiguous structures or in association with metastases to regional soft tissues and lymph nodes. Most of these patients experience progressive pain, motor loss, and sensory dysfunction. Metastases directly to the peripheral nerves are rare in patients with solid tumors but are more frequently encountered in patients with hematologic malignancies. Metastases to the spinal roots and the spinal cord usually occur in patients who also have demonstrable evidence of leptomeningeal or intraparenchymal brain metastases. These conditions may overlap and must be distinguished from other causes of plexus, nerve, or spinal cord disorders in the patient with cancer. Early identification and appropriate treatment allow these patients to remain functional and interactive with family and friends.",
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Metastases involving spinal cord, roots, and plexus. / Jaeckle, Kurt.

In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.01.2011, p. 855-871.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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N2 - Neurogenic pain is common in patients with widespread metastatic cancer. Pain of this type is often severe and typically results from neoplastic invasion of the peripheral nerves, spinal roots, or spinal cord. Tumors may invade the cervical, brachial, or lumbosacral plexuses either by direct extension from contiguous structures or in association with metastases to regional soft tissues and lymph nodes. Most of these patients experience progressive pain, motor loss, and sensory dysfunction. Metastases directly to the peripheral nerves are rare in patients with solid tumors but are more frequently encountered in patients with hematologic malignancies. Metastases to the spinal roots and the spinal cord usually occur in patients who also have demonstrable evidence of leptomeningeal or intraparenchymal brain metastases. These conditions may overlap and must be distinguished from other causes of plexus, nerve, or spinal cord disorders in the patient with cancer. Early identification and appropriate treatment allow these patients to remain functional and interactive with family and friends.

AB - Neurogenic pain is common in patients with widespread metastatic cancer. Pain of this type is often severe and typically results from neoplastic invasion of the peripheral nerves, spinal roots, or spinal cord. Tumors may invade the cervical, brachial, or lumbosacral plexuses either by direct extension from contiguous structures or in association with metastases to regional soft tissues and lymph nodes. Most of these patients experience progressive pain, motor loss, and sensory dysfunction. Metastases directly to the peripheral nerves are rare in patients with solid tumors but are more frequently encountered in patients with hematologic malignancies. Metastases to the spinal roots and the spinal cord usually occur in patients who also have demonstrable evidence of leptomeningeal or intraparenchymal brain metastases. These conditions may overlap and must be distinguished from other causes of plexus, nerve, or spinal cord disorders in the patient with cancer. Early identification and appropriate treatment allow these patients to remain functional and interactive with family and friends.

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