Mesenteric blood flow in patients with diabetic neuropathy

Irwin M. Best, Annette Pitzele, Andrew Green, John Halperin, Robert Mason, Fabio Giron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined flow velocities in the superior mesenteric artery and celiac artery in normal controls (group C, n = 11), diabetic patients (group D, n = 8), and diabetic patients with clinically evident autonomic neuropathy (group DN, n = 6) to further define the usefulness of duplex examination in the evaluation of the mesenteric circulation in normal and disease states. By use of a 3 MHz duplex scanner, peak systolic velocity, peak diastolic forward velocity, end-diastolic forward velocity, and peak diastolic reverse velocity were measured in centimeters per second before and after a standardized meal. The vessels' diameters in centimeters were also measured. After the meal peak diastolic reverse velocity disappeared in all patients. The average vessel diameter in the superior mesenteric artery (0.7 cm) and celiac artery (0.8 cm) did not change. Flow velocities in the celiac artery were not significantly altered by the meal. In the control group, peak systolic velocity in the superior mesenteric artery increased 38%, peak diastolic forward velocity rose 66%, and end-diastolic forward velocity increased by 70%. In the diabetic nonneuropathic group the changes were 15%, 98%, and 100%, respectively. These changes were statistically significant (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy presenting a picture of gastroparesis did not exhibit the expected increases in postprandial velocities. Moreover, this alteration in blood flow velocity, although similar to that encountered in patients with intestinal angina, did not appear to be due to occlusive arterial disease on the basis of clinical examination and B-mode scanning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Diabetic Neuropathies
Celiac Artery
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Meals
Splanchnic Circulation
Gastroparesis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Control Groups
Blood Flow Velocity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Best, Irwin M. ; Pitzele, Annette ; Green, Andrew ; Halperin, John ; Mason, Robert ; Giron, Fabio. / Mesenteric blood flow in patients with diabetic neuropathy. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1991 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 84-90.
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Mesenteric blood flow in patients with diabetic neuropathy. / Best, Irwin M.; Pitzele, Annette; Green, Andrew; Halperin, John; Mason, Robert; Giron, Fabio.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.1991, p. 84-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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