Magnetic electroanatomical mapping for ablation of focal atrial tachycardias

Francis Marchlinski, David Callans, Charles Gottlieb, Enrique Rodriguez, Robert Coyne, David Kleinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Uniform success for ablation of focal atrial tachycardias has been difficult to achieve using standard catheter mapping and ablation techniques. In addition, our understanding of the complex relationship between atrial anatomy, electrophysiology, and surface ECG P wave morphology remains primitive. The magnetic eIectroanatomical mapping and display system (CARTO) offers an on-line display of electrical activation and/or signal amplitude related to the anatomical location of the recorded sites in the mapped chamber. A window of electrical interest is established based on signals timed from an electrical reference that usually represents a fixed electrogram recording from the coronary sinus or the atrial appendage. This window of electrical interest is established to include atrial activation prior to the onset of the P wave activity associated with the site of origin of a focal atrial tachycardia. Anatomical and electrical landmarks are defined with limited fluoroscopic imaging support and more detailed global chamber and more focal atrial mapping can be performed with minimal fluoroscopic guidance. A three-dimensional color map representing atrial activation or voltage amplitude at the magnetically defined anatomical sites is displayed with on-line data acquisition. This display can be manipulated to facilitate viewing from any angle. Altering the zoom control, triangle fill threshold, clipping plane, or color range can all enhance the display of a more focal area of interest. We documented the feasibility of using this single mapping catheter technique for localizing and ablating focal atrial tachycardias. In a consecutive series of 8 patients with 9 focal atrial tachycardias, the use of the single catheter CARTO mapping system was associated with ablation success in all but one patient who had a left atrial tachycardia localized to the medial aspect of the orifice of the left atrial appendage. Only low power energy delivery was used in this patient because of the unavailability of temperature monitoring in the early version of the Navistar catheter, the location of the arrhythmia, and the history of arrhythmia control with flecainide. No attempt was made to limit fluoroscopy time in our study population. Nevertheless, despite data acquisition from 120-320 anatomically distinct sites during global and more detailed focal atrial mapping, total fluoroscopy exposure was typically < 30 minutes and was as little as 12 minutes. The detailed display capabilities of the CARTe system appear to offer the potential of enhancing our understanding of atrial anatomy, atrial activation, and their relationship to surface ECG P wave morphology during focal atrial tachycardias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1621-1635
Number of pages15
JournalPACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 24 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tachycardia
Atrial Appendage
Catheters
Fluoroscopy
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Anatomy
Electrocardiography
Color
Ablation Techniques
Flecainide
Catheter Ablation
Coronary Sinus
Electrophysiology
History
Temperature
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Marchlinski, Francis ; Callans, David ; Gottlieb, Charles ; Rodriguez, Enrique ; Coyne, Robert ; Kleinman, David. / Magnetic electroanatomical mapping for ablation of focal atrial tachycardias. In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 8. pp. 1621-1635.
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Magnetic electroanatomical mapping for ablation of focal atrial tachycardias. / Marchlinski, Francis; Callans, David; Gottlieb, Charles; Rodriguez, Enrique; Coyne, Robert; Kleinman, David.

In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, Vol. 21, No. 8, 24.08.1998, p. 1621-1635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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