Lyme neuroborreliosis: Peripheral nervous system manifestations

J. Halperin, Benjamin J. Luft, David J. Volkman, Raymond J. Dattwyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

164 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An ever increasing number of apparently unrelated peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders has been associated with Lyme borreliosis. To ascertain their relative frequency and significance, we studied prospectively 74 consecutive patients with late Lyme disease, with and without PNS symptoms: 53% had intermittent limb paraesthesiae, 25% the carpal tunnel syndrome, 8% painful radiculopathy, and 3% Bell's palsy; 39% had disseminated neurophysiological abnormalities. To assess the interrelationships among these syndromes, we reviewed the neurophysiological findings in all 163 such patients that we have studied to date. Reversible abnormalities of distal conduction were the most common finding. Demyelinating neuropathy was extremely rare. The pattern of abnormality was similar in all patient groups, regardless of whether the symptoms suggested radiculopathy, Bell's palsy, or neuropathy. We conclude that (1) reversible PNS abnormalities occur in one-third of our patients with late Lyme borreliosis, and (2) the pattern of electrophysiological abnormalities is the same in all and is indicative of widespread axonal damage, suggesting that these different presentations reflect varying manifestations of the same pathological process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1221
Number of pages15
JournalBrain
Volume113
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Peripheral Nervous System
Lyme Disease
Bell Palsy
Radiculopathy
Nervous System Malformations
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Paresthesia
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Extremities

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Halperin, J., Luft, B. J., Volkman, D. J., & Dattwyler, R. J. (1990). Lyme neuroborreliosis: Peripheral nervous system manifestations. Brain, 113(4), 1207-1221. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/113.4.1207
Halperin, J. ; Luft, Benjamin J. ; Volkman, David J. ; Dattwyler, Raymond J. / Lyme neuroborreliosis : Peripheral nervous system manifestations. In: Brain. 1990 ; Vol. 113, No. 4. pp. 1207-1221.
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Halperin, J, Luft, BJ, Volkman, DJ & Dattwyler, RJ 1990, 'Lyme neuroborreliosis: Peripheral nervous system manifestations', Brain, vol. 113, no. 4, pp. 1207-1221. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/113.4.1207

Lyme neuroborreliosis : Peripheral nervous system manifestations. / Halperin, J.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Volkman, David J.; Dattwyler, Raymond J.

In: Brain, Vol. 113, No. 4, 01.08.1990, p. 1207-1221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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