Lyme disease of the brainstem

Peter Kalina, Andrew Decker, Ezriel Kornel, John J. Halperin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)903-907
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroradiology
Volume47
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Disease
Positron-Emission Tomography
Brain Stem
Central Nervous System
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain Stem Neoplasms
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Ticks
Meningitis
Communicable Diseases
Pathology
Inflammation
Biopsy
Brain
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Kalina, Peter ; Decker, Andrew ; Kornel, Ezriel ; Halperin, John J. / Lyme disease of the brainstem. In: Neuroradiology. 2005 ; Vol. 47, No. 12. pp. 903-907.
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Kalina, P, Decker, A, Kornel, E & Halperin, JJ 2005, 'Lyme disease of the brainstem', Neuroradiology, vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 903-907. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00234-005-1440-2

Lyme disease of the brainstem. / Kalina, Peter; Decker, Andrew; Kornel, Ezriel; Halperin, John J.

In: Neuroradiology, Vol. 47, No. 12, 01.12.2005, p. 903-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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