Lyme disease: Neurology, Neurobiology, and Behavior

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection) - or encephalopathies of other etiologies - would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as "posttreatment Lyme disease" and "chronic Lyme disease" may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1267-1272
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume58
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Lyme Disease
Neurobiology
Neurology
Nervous System
Brain Diseases
Borrelia Infections
Central Nervous System Infections
Borrelia burgdorferi
Infection
Chronic Disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Lyme disease: Neurology, Neurobiology, and Behavior",
abstract = "The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection) - or encephalopathies of other etiologies - would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as {"}posttreatment Lyme disease{"} and {"}chronic Lyme disease{"} may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.",
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Lyme disease : Neurology, Neurobiology, and Behavior. / Halperin, John J.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 58, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 1267-1272.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection) - or encephalopathies of other etiologies - would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as "posttreatment Lyme disease" and "chronic Lyme disease" may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.

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