Lyme disease

Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy

John Halperin, Brian W. Little, Patricia K. Coyle, Raymond J. Dattwyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peripheral nerve dysfunction was demonstrated in 36% of patients with late Lyme disease. Of 36 patients evaluated, 14 had prominent limb paresthesias. Thirteen of these had neurophysiologic evidence of peripheral neuropathy; neurologic examinations were normal in most. Repeat testing following treatment documented rapid improvement in 11 of 12. We conclude that this neuropathy, which is quite different from the infrequent peripheral nerve syndromes previously described in this illness, is commonly present in late Lyme disease. This neuropathy presents with intermittent paresthesias without significant deficits on clinical examination and is reversible with appropriate antibiotic treatment. Neurophysiologic testing provides a useful diagnostic tool and an important measure of response to treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1700-1706
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume37
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Disease
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Paresthesia
Peripheral Nerves
Neurologic Examination
Therapeutics
Extremities
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Halperin, J., Little, B. W., Coyle, P. K., & Dattwyler, R. J. (1987). Lyme disease: Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy. Neurology, 37(11), 1700-1706.
Halperin, John ; Little, Brian W. ; Coyle, Patricia K. ; Dattwyler, Raymond J. / Lyme disease : Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy. In: Neurology. 1987 ; Vol. 37, No. 11. pp. 1700-1706.
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Halperin, J, Little, BW, Coyle, PK & Dattwyler, RJ 1987, 'Lyme disease: Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy', Neurology, vol. 37, no. 11, pp. 1700-1706.

Lyme disease : Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy. / Halperin, John; Little, Brian W.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Dattwyler, Raymond J.

In: Neurology, Vol. 37, No. 11, 01.01.1987, p. 1700-1706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Halperin J, Little BW, Coyle PK, Dattwyler RJ. Lyme disease: Cause of a treatable peripheral neuropathy. Neurology. 1987 Jan 1;37(11):1700-1706.