Lyme disease and the peripheral nervous system

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a broad variety of peripheral nerve disorders, including single or multiple cranial neuropathies, painful radiculopathies, and diffuse polyneuropathies. Virtually all appear to be varying manifestations of a mononeuropathy multiplex. Diagnosis requires that the patient should have had possible exposure to the only known vectors, Ixodes ticks, and also have either other pathognomonic clinical manifestations or laboratory evidence of exposure. Treatment with antimicrobial regimens is highly effective. The mechanism underlying these neuropathies remains unclear, although interactions between anti-Borrelia antibodies and several peripheral nerve constituent molecules raise intriguing possibilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-143
Number of pages11
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Ticks
Peripheral Nerves
Mononeuropathies
Borrelia
Cranial Nerve Diseases
Ixodes
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Radiculopathy
Lyme Disease
Polyneuropathies
Communicable Diseases
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Lyme disease and the peripheral nervous system",
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Lyme disease and the peripheral nervous system. / Halperin, John J.

In: Muscle and Nerve, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.08.2003, p. 133-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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