Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

C. D. Liu, Rolando Rolandelli, S. W. Ashley, B. Evans, M. Shin, D. W. McFadden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), laparoscopic approaches have been avoided because of the often fragile intestinal tissue, thickened mesentery, malnutrition, immunosuppression, and the presence of dense adhesions. In this article, we report 10 successfully managed laparoscopic cases in IBD patients (five with ulcerative colitis, five with Crohn's Disease). Patients with ulcerative colitis underwent total abdominal colectomies, mucosal proctectomies, J-pouch construction, and diverting ileostomies. Procedures in patients with Crohn's disease included ileocecectomy (3), sigmoid colectomy with takedown of a transverse colonic fistula (1), and stricturoplasty (1). One of the 10 cases was converted to an open technique for technical reasons. Six of the 10 patients were on high dose corticosteroids for disease control. Hospital stay ranged from 6-13 days, with a median of 7 days. The morbidity rate was 20 per cent, and included one case of mild postoperative pancreatitis in a Crohn's disease patient and one delayed peri-ileostomy fistula in an ulcerative colitis patient. There was no mortality. Based on these results, we conclude that laparoscopic intestinal surgery is both feasible and safe in selected patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Use of laparoscopic techniques in these patients may reduce hospital stay, lessen adhesion formation, and improve cosmetic results in this generally young group of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1054-1056
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume61
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Laparoscopy
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Ileostomy
Colectomy
Fistula
Length of Stay
Colonic Pouches
Mesentery
Sigmoid Colon
Cosmetics
Malnutrition
Pancreatitis
Immunosuppression
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Liu, C. D., Rolandelli, R., Ashley, S. W., Evans, B., Shin, M., & McFadden, D. W. (1995). Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease. American Surgeon, 61(12), 1054-1056.
Liu, C. D. ; Rolandelli, Rolando ; Ashley, S. W. ; Evans, B. ; Shin, M. ; McFadden, D. W. / Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease. In: American Surgeon. 1995 ; Vol. 61, No. 12. pp. 1054-1056.
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Liu, CD, Rolandelli, R, Ashley, SW, Evans, B, Shin, M & McFadden, DW 1995, 'Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease', American Surgeon, vol. 61, no. 12, pp. 1054-1056.

Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease. / Liu, C. D.; Rolandelli, Rolando; Ashley, S. W.; Evans, B.; Shin, M.; McFadden, D. W.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 61, No. 12, 01.12.1995, p. 1054-1056.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Liu CD, Rolandelli R, Ashley SW, Evans B, Shin M, McFadden DW. Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease. American Surgeon. 1995 Dec 1;61(12):1054-1056.