Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies

Peter R. Dottino, Daniel Tobias, Annmarie Beddoe, Anne L. Golden, Carmel J. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of our study was to detail our 5-year experience with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98, we performed laparoscopic lymphadenectomies on 94 patients with various gynecologic malignancies. Pelvic, paraaortic, and combinations of both pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomies were performed depending on the primary site of disease and indication for lymph node dissection. Data were prospectively collected on all patients. Results. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98 we performed 94 laparoscopic lymphadenectomies for gynecologic malignancies. The distribution included 64 patients with cervical cancer, 14 with ovarian cancer, 12 with endometrial cancer, 2 with fallopian tube cancer, 1 with a uterine malignant mixed mesodermal tumor, and 1 with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. Fifty-five patients had only pelvic lymph node dissections, 9 patients had paraaortic dissections only, and 30 had both pelvic and paraaortic dissections performed. Among 30 patients having laparoscopic lymphadenectomy only, the mean hospital stay was 3.6 days. Included in this group were 19 patients who received postoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer as inpatients prior to ambulatory radiation therapy. The mean length of stay for this group was 4.6 days versus 1.7 days for the 11 patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.0025). The mean number of pelvic nodes was 11.9 (range 0- 57), with a mean of 4.5 between 11/5/92 and 12/31/95 and a mean of 19.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. The mean number of paraaortic nodes obtained was 3.7 (range 0-14), with a mean of 3.4 from 11/5/92 to 12/31/95 and a mean of 4.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. A total of 3 patients required conversions to laparotomy. One was for a vascular injury to the vena cava, 1 for a large tumor extending to both sidewalls, and the third for removal of densely matted lymph nodes. Conclusions. Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy is a technically feasible procedure for patients with gynecologic malignancies requiring lymph node dissections, with an acceptable safety profile and nodal yield. The number of nodes obtained increased in direct proportion to operator experience. In addition, patients may benefit from a decrease in hospital stay compared to conventional lymphadenectomy via laparotomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-388
Number of pages6
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Lymph Node Excision
Neoplasms
Length of Stay
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Laparotomy
Dissection
Fallopian Tube Neoplasms
Malignant Mixed Tumor
Drug Therapy
Venae Cavae
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Vascular System Injuries
Endometrial Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Inpatients
Radiotherapy
Lymph Nodes
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Dottino, P. R., Tobias, D., Beddoe, A., Golden, A. L., & Cohen, C. J. (1999). Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. Gynecologic Oncology, 73(3), 383-388. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1999.5376
Dottino, Peter R. ; Tobias, Daniel ; Beddoe, Annmarie ; Golden, Anne L. ; Cohen, Carmel J. / Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 1999 ; Vol. 73, No. 3. pp. 383-388.
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Dottino, PR, Tobias, D, Beddoe, A, Golden, AL & Cohen, CJ 1999, 'Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies', Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 383-388. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1999.5376

Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. / Dottino, Peter R.; Tobias, Daniel; Beddoe, Annmarie; Golden, Anne L.; Cohen, Carmel J.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 73, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 383-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies

AU - Dottino, Peter R.

AU - Tobias, Daniel

AU - Beddoe, Annmarie

AU - Golden, Anne L.

AU - Cohen, Carmel J.

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Objective. The purpose of our study was to detail our 5-year experience with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98, we performed laparoscopic lymphadenectomies on 94 patients with various gynecologic malignancies. Pelvic, paraaortic, and combinations of both pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomies were performed depending on the primary site of disease and indication for lymph node dissection. Data were prospectively collected on all patients. Results. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98 we performed 94 laparoscopic lymphadenectomies for gynecologic malignancies. The distribution included 64 patients with cervical cancer, 14 with ovarian cancer, 12 with endometrial cancer, 2 with fallopian tube cancer, 1 with a uterine malignant mixed mesodermal tumor, and 1 with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. Fifty-five patients had only pelvic lymph node dissections, 9 patients had paraaortic dissections only, and 30 had both pelvic and paraaortic dissections performed. Among 30 patients having laparoscopic lymphadenectomy only, the mean hospital stay was 3.6 days. Included in this group were 19 patients who received postoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer as inpatients prior to ambulatory radiation therapy. The mean length of stay for this group was 4.6 days versus 1.7 days for the 11 patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.0025). The mean number of pelvic nodes was 11.9 (range 0- 57), with a mean of 4.5 between 11/5/92 and 12/31/95 and a mean of 19.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. The mean number of paraaortic nodes obtained was 3.7 (range 0-14), with a mean of 3.4 from 11/5/92 to 12/31/95 and a mean of 4.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. A total of 3 patients required conversions to laparotomy. One was for a vascular injury to the vena cava, 1 for a large tumor extending to both sidewalls, and the third for removal of densely matted lymph nodes. Conclusions. Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy is a technically feasible procedure for patients with gynecologic malignancies requiring lymph node dissections, with an acceptable safety profile and nodal yield. The number of nodes obtained increased in direct proportion to operator experience. In addition, patients may benefit from a decrease in hospital stay compared to conventional lymphadenectomy via laparotomy.

AB - Objective. The purpose of our study was to detail our 5-year experience with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98, we performed laparoscopic lymphadenectomies on 94 patients with various gynecologic malignancies. Pelvic, paraaortic, and combinations of both pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomies were performed depending on the primary site of disease and indication for lymph node dissection. Data were prospectively collected on all patients. Results. From 11/5/92 to 3/9/98 we performed 94 laparoscopic lymphadenectomies for gynecologic malignancies. The distribution included 64 patients with cervical cancer, 14 with ovarian cancer, 12 with endometrial cancer, 2 with fallopian tube cancer, 1 with a uterine malignant mixed mesodermal tumor, and 1 with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. Fifty-five patients had only pelvic lymph node dissections, 9 patients had paraaortic dissections only, and 30 had both pelvic and paraaortic dissections performed. Among 30 patients having laparoscopic lymphadenectomy only, the mean hospital stay was 3.6 days. Included in this group were 19 patients who received postoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer as inpatients prior to ambulatory radiation therapy. The mean length of stay for this group was 4.6 days versus 1.7 days for the 11 patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.0025). The mean number of pelvic nodes was 11.9 (range 0- 57), with a mean of 4.5 between 11/5/92 and 12/31/95 and a mean of 19.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. The mean number of paraaortic nodes obtained was 3.7 (range 0-14), with a mean of 3.4 from 11/5/92 to 12/31/95 and a mean of 4.1 from 1/1/96 to 3/9/98. A total of 3 patients required conversions to laparotomy. One was for a vascular injury to the vena cava, 1 for a large tumor extending to both sidewalls, and the third for removal of densely matted lymph nodes. Conclusions. Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy is a technically feasible procedure for patients with gynecologic malignancies requiring lymph node dissections, with an acceptable safety profile and nodal yield. The number of nodes obtained increased in direct proportion to operator experience. In addition, patients may benefit from a decrease in hospital stay compared to conventional lymphadenectomy via laparotomy.

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