Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) hysteropexy

Michael S. Ingber, Marc D. Colton, Gregg E. Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Uterine prolapse is one of the common reasons for hysterectomy throughout the world. However, recent data has shown that uterine-sparing techniques appear to be equivocal to that of hysterectomy. Older reports of intraabdominal uterine suspension describe open approaches and more recent descriptions involve robotic and laparoscopic approaches utilizing mesh. We describe the first reported laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) sacral hysteropexy utilizing a strip of polypropylene mesh placed posteriorly on the uterus and attached to the sacral promontory. A 45-year-old female with grade 3 uterine prolapse, cystocele, and rectocele underwent the procedure. The procedure involved access utilizing a single-port system placed transumbilically, and dissection using articulating laparoscopic instruments. The hysteropexy was completed by placing a 3-cm wide strip of polypropylene mesh along the posterior vaginal wall and cervicouterine junction, and suturing the proximal end to the anterior longitudinal ligament overlying the sacral promontory. The patient was discharged home within 18 h of the procedure. At 6 month follow-up, the patient has excellent anatomic support, with no evidence for recurrence of prolapse. LESS hysteropexy appears to be a safe, effective procedure for uterine prolapse and provides patients with excellent outcome with no visible scar. Additional studies will determine whether the LESS approach provides any benefit when compared with robotic or traditional laparoscopic approaches with respect to blood loss, pain, and time of full recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-57
Number of pages5
JournalUpdates in Surgery
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Uterine Prolapse
Polypropylenes
Robotics
Hysterectomy
Longitudinal Ligaments
Rectocele
Cystocele
Prolapse
Uterus
Cicatrix
Dissection
Suspensions
Recurrence
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Ingber, Michael S. ; Colton, Marc D. ; Zimmerman, Gregg E. / Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) hysteropexy. In: Updates in Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 53-57.
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Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) hysteropexy. / Ingber, Michael S.; Colton, Marc D.; Zimmerman, Gregg E.

In: Updates in Surgery, Vol. 64, No. 1, 29.06.2012, p. 53-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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