Intracardiac ultrasound determination of left ventricular volumes: In vitro and in vivo validation

John P. Fisher, Carrie A. Wolfberg, Joseph S. Mikan, Francis J. Kiernan, Daniel B. Fram, Raymond G. McKay, Linda D. Gillam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of calculating left ventricular volumes using intracardiac ultrasound. Background. Previous studies have validated transthoracic echocardiographic determinations of left ventricular volumes and have indicated the superiority of Simpson rule reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of imaging the left ventricle with intracardiac ultrasound has also been demonstrated. Methods. The determination of left ventricular volumes with Simpson rule reconstruction of intracardiac ultrasound images was evaluated in two phases. In vitro validation was performed in 29 animal hearts preserved in either a nondistended or distended state. Latex cast volumes were the reference standard. In vivo studies used 14 pigs, and compared intracardiac ultrasound volumes and ejection fraction with single-plane contrast angiographic values. A 12.5-MHz device was used to record short-axis images at 0.5-cm intervals. These were used to reconstruct the ventricle as a stack of cylindric elements using all imaged levels as well as sections recorded every 1 and 2 cm and at a single midventricular level. Results. In the in vitro hearts, when all recorded sections were used, there was excellent agreement between intracardiac ultrasound and latex cast volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.89 latex cast volume + 2.22, r = 0.95; intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.97 latex cast volume + 0.91, r = 0.99) for nondistended and distended hearts, respectively. In vivo, there was again close correspondence between ultrasound and angiographic volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 1.04 angiographic volume -3.6, r = 0.91). The relation between intracardiac ultrasound and angiographic ejection fraction was fair (intracardiac ultrasound ejection fraction = 1.00 angiographic ejection fraction + 6.85, r = 0.69). Excellent correlations for the volumes were maintained as the number of cross sections was reduced to those recorded every 1 and 2 cm (r = 0.87 to 0.99). With a single midventricular site more variable but generally good correlations were obtained (r = 0.77 to 0.99). Conclusions. The application of Simpson rule reconstruction to short-axis images of the left ventricle obtained with intracardiac ultrasound provides accurate determination of left ventricular volumes in animal hearts. This technique may prove useful in the analysis of left ventricular structure and function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-253
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Latex
Heart Ventricles
Left Ventricular Function
Swine
Equipment and Supplies
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Fisher, John P. ; Wolfberg, Carrie A. ; Mikan, Joseph S. ; Kiernan, Francis J. ; Fram, Daniel B. ; McKay, Raymond G. ; Gillam, Linda D. / Intracardiac ultrasound determination of left ventricular volumes : In vitro and in vivo validation. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1994 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 247-253.
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title = "Intracardiac ultrasound determination of left ventricular volumes: In vitro and in vivo validation",
abstract = "Objectives. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of calculating left ventricular volumes using intracardiac ultrasound. Background. Previous studies have validated transthoracic echocardiographic determinations of left ventricular volumes and have indicated the superiority of Simpson rule reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of imaging the left ventricle with intracardiac ultrasound has also been demonstrated. Methods. The determination of left ventricular volumes with Simpson rule reconstruction of intracardiac ultrasound images was evaluated in two phases. In vitro validation was performed in 29 animal hearts preserved in either a nondistended or distended state. Latex cast volumes were the reference standard. In vivo studies used 14 pigs, and compared intracardiac ultrasound volumes and ejection fraction with single-plane contrast angiographic values. A 12.5-MHz device was used to record short-axis images at 0.5-cm intervals. These were used to reconstruct the ventricle as a stack of cylindric elements using all imaged levels as well as sections recorded every 1 and 2 cm and at a single midventricular level. Results. In the in vitro hearts, when all recorded sections were used, there was excellent agreement between intracardiac ultrasound and latex cast volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.89 latex cast volume + 2.22, r = 0.95; intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.97 latex cast volume + 0.91, r = 0.99) for nondistended and distended hearts, respectively. In vivo, there was again close correspondence between ultrasound and angiographic volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 1.04 angiographic volume -3.6, r = 0.91). The relation between intracardiac ultrasound and angiographic ejection fraction was fair (intracardiac ultrasound ejection fraction = 1.00 angiographic ejection fraction + 6.85, r = 0.69). Excellent correlations for the volumes were maintained as the number of cross sections was reduced to those recorded every 1 and 2 cm (r = 0.87 to 0.99). With a single midventricular site more variable but generally good correlations were obtained (r = 0.77 to 0.99). Conclusions. The application of Simpson rule reconstruction to short-axis images of the left ventricle obtained with intracardiac ultrasound provides accurate determination of left ventricular volumes in animal hearts. This technique may prove useful in the analysis of left ventricular structure and function.",
author = "Fisher, {John P.} and Wolfberg, {Carrie A.} and Mikan, {Joseph S.} and Kiernan, {Francis J.} and Fram, {Daniel B.} and McKay, {Raymond G.} and Gillam, {Linda D.}",
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Intracardiac ultrasound determination of left ventricular volumes : In vitro and in vivo validation. / Fisher, John P.; Wolfberg, Carrie A.; Mikan, Joseph S.; Kiernan, Francis J.; Fram, Daniel B.; McKay, Raymond G.; Gillam, Linda D.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 24, No. 1, 07.1994, p. 247-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intracardiac ultrasound determination of left ventricular volumes

T2 - In vitro and in vivo validation

AU - Fisher, John P.

AU - Wolfberg, Carrie A.

AU - Mikan, Joseph S.

AU - Kiernan, Francis J.

AU - Fram, Daniel B.

AU - McKay, Raymond G.

AU - Gillam, Linda D.

PY - 1994/7

Y1 - 1994/7

N2 - Objectives. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of calculating left ventricular volumes using intracardiac ultrasound. Background. Previous studies have validated transthoracic echocardiographic determinations of left ventricular volumes and have indicated the superiority of Simpson rule reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of imaging the left ventricle with intracardiac ultrasound has also been demonstrated. Methods. The determination of left ventricular volumes with Simpson rule reconstruction of intracardiac ultrasound images was evaluated in two phases. In vitro validation was performed in 29 animal hearts preserved in either a nondistended or distended state. Latex cast volumes were the reference standard. In vivo studies used 14 pigs, and compared intracardiac ultrasound volumes and ejection fraction with single-plane contrast angiographic values. A 12.5-MHz device was used to record short-axis images at 0.5-cm intervals. These were used to reconstruct the ventricle as a stack of cylindric elements using all imaged levels as well as sections recorded every 1 and 2 cm and at a single midventricular level. Results. In the in vitro hearts, when all recorded sections were used, there was excellent agreement between intracardiac ultrasound and latex cast volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.89 latex cast volume + 2.22, r = 0.95; intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.97 latex cast volume + 0.91, r = 0.99) for nondistended and distended hearts, respectively. In vivo, there was again close correspondence between ultrasound and angiographic volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 1.04 angiographic volume -3.6, r = 0.91). The relation between intracardiac ultrasound and angiographic ejection fraction was fair (intracardiac ultrasound ejection fraction = 1.00 angiographic ejection fraction + 6.85, r = 0.69). Excellent correlations for the volumes were maintained as the number of cross sections was reduced to those recorded every 1 and 2 cm (r = 0.87 to 0.99). With a single midventricular site more variable but generally good correlations were obtained (r = 0.77 to 0.99). Conclusions. The application of Simpson rule reconstruction to short-axis images of the left ventricle obtained with intracardiac ultrasound provides accurate determination of left ventricular volumes in animal hearts. This technique may prove useful in the analysis of left ventricular structure and function.

AB - Objectives. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of calculating left ventricular volumes using intracardiac ultrasound. Background. Previous studies have validated transthoracic echocardiographic determinations of left ventricular volumes and have indicated the superiority of Simpson rule reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of imaging the left ventricle with intracardiac ultrasound has also been demonstrated. Methods. The determination of left ventricular volumes with Simpson rule reconstruction of intracardiac ultrasound images was evaluated in two phases. In vitro validation was performed in 29 animal hearts preserved in either a nondistended or distended state. Latex cast volumes were the reference standard. In vivo studies used 14 pigs, and compared intracardiac ultrasound volumes and ejection fraction with single-plane contrast angiographic values. A 12.5-MHz device was used to record short-axis images at 0.5-cm intervals. These were used to reconstruct the ventricle as a stack of cylindric elements using all imaged levels as well as sections recorded every 1 and 2 cm and at a single midventricular level. Results. In the in vitro hearts, when all recorded sections were used, there was excellent agreement between intracardiac ultrasound and latex cast volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.89 latex cast volume + 2.22, r = 0.95; intracardiac ultrasound volume = 0.97 latex cast volume + 0.91, r = 0.99) for nondistended and distended hearts, respectively. In vivo, there was again close correspondence between ultrasound and angiographic volumes (intracardiac ultrasound volume = 1.04 angiographic volume -3.6, r = 0.91). The relation between intracardiac ultrasound and angiographic ejection fraction was fair (intracardiac ultrasound ejection fraction = 1.00 angiographic ejection fraction + 6.85, r = 0.69). Excellent correlations for the volumes were maintained as the number of cross sections was reduced to those recorded every 1 and 2 cm (r = 0.87 to 0.99). With a single midventricular site more variable but generally good correlations were obtained (r = 0.77 to 0.99). Conclusions. The application of Simpson rule reconstruction to short-axis images of the left ventricle obtained with intracardiac ultrasound provides accurate determination of left ventricular volumes in animal hearts. This technique may prove useful in the analysis of left ventricular structure and function.

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