In vivo radiofrequency thermal balloon angioplasty of porcine coronary arteries: Histologic effects and safety

Daniel B. Fram, Thomas A. Aretz, Joseph F. Mikan, Adam Raisner, Joseph F. Mitchel, Linda Gillam, David D. Waters, Raymond G. McKay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and histologic effects of radiofrequency thermal balloon angioplasty in the coronary vasculature of normal pigs. Radiofrequency thermal balloon angioplasty was performed in 30 coronary arteries of 16 nonatheroslerotic pigs. Heated inflations were performed at either 50°, 60°, or 70° C for 30 or 60 seconds, and were compared with five nonheated inflations in five additional arteries. All balloon inflations were performed at 2 atm pressure with a balloon/vessel diameter ratio of 1.2 to 1. Heart rate, arterial pressure, and left ventricular pressure were monitored continuously for each animal. A 12-lead ECG, coronary angiography, and two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography were performed before and 1 hour after each balloon inflation. Each animal was subsequently put to death for postmortem cardiac examination. Heated inflations were well tolerated in 28 of the 30 arteries without significant adverse effects. During one inflation, ventricular fibrillation occurred because of prolonged ischemia from an occlusive guiding catheter. In another artery, a heated inflation resulted in a dissection with a transient decrease in distal coronary flow. Histologic examination revealed a significant increase in wall thinning and elastic fiber straightening with heating at 70° C for both 30 and 60 seconds, and a significant increase in intracoronary thrombus with heating at 70° C for 60 seconds. Depth of periarterial myocardial heat necrosis paralleled the increase in temperature, with an average depth of 166 μm at 50° C, 312 μm at 60° C, and 1031μm at 70° C. In vivo, radiofrequency coronary angioplasty can be performed relatively safely without significant electrical, hemodynamic, or ischemic changes beyond those seen with conventional nonthermal angioplasty. The extent of heat-induced vessel wall thinning, elastic tissue straightening, intracoronary thrombus formation, and periarterial myocardial necrosis are all related to balloon temperature or duration of heating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)969-978
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume126
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Balloon Angioplasty
Economic Inflation
Coronary Vessels
Swine
Hot Temperature
Safety
Heating
Elastic Tissue
Arteries
Angioplasty
Echocardiography
Thrombosis
Necrosis
Temperature
Coronary Balloon Angioplasty
Ventricular Fibrillation
Ventricular Pressure
Coronary Angiography
Dissection
Autopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Fram, Daniel B. ; Aretz, Thomas A. ; Mikan, Joseph F. ; Raisner, Adam ; Mitchel, Joseph F. ; Gillam, Linda ; Waters, David D. ; McKay, Raymond G. / In vivo radiofrequency thermal balloon angioplasty of porcine coronary arteries : Histologic effects and safety. In: American Heart Journal. 1993 ; Vol. 126, No. 4. pp. 969-978.
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In vivo radiofrequency thermal balloon angioplasty of porcine coronary arteries : Histologic effects and safety. / Fram, Daniel B.; Aretz, Thomas A.; Mikan, Joseph F.; Raisner, Adam; Mitchel, Joseph F.; Gillam, Linda; Waters, David D.; McKay, Raymond G.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 126, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 969-978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Fram, Daniel B.

AU - Aretz, Thomas A.

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