Hepatic resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases

A fifteen-year experience with ninety-six patients

Lawrence Harrison, Murray F. Brennan, Elliot Newman, Joseph G. Fortner, Anthony Picardo, Leslie H. Blumgart, Yuman Fong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. The role of liver resection for hepatic metastases from noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine (NCNN) cancers is unknown. This study examine, a large, single institutional experience of hepatic resection for NCNN metastases. Methods. Records of 96 patients who underwent liver resection for metastatic NCNN cancer from 1980 to 1995 at a single institution were reviewed. Survival after liver resection in this cohort of patients is reported, and factors predictive of survival are analyzed. Results. Resection was performed for liver metastases from genitourinary primary tumors (n = 34), soft tissue primary tumors (n = 41), and metastases from other primary cancers (n = 21). Extent of liver resection included wedge (n = 32), lobectomy (n = 44), and extended hepatic lobectomy (n = 20). No operative deaths occurred. Overall survival rate after resection at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80%, 45% and 37%, respectively (median survival, 32 months), with 12 actual 5-year survivors. There was no difference in survival according to the type of liver resection bilateral versus unilateral disease, or resection of extrahepatic disease. Disease-free interval of less than 36 months before discovery of liver metastases, curative resection, and primary tumor group (genitourinary was greater than soft tissue, which was greater than gastrointestinal) were predictors of a significantly better survival by multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Primary tumor type, disease-free interval, and curative resection predict those patients who benefit from hepatic resection. Hepatic resection for patients with NCNN metastasis has value in carefully selected patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-632
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Neoplasm Metastasis
Liver
Neoplasms
Survival
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Multivariate Analysis
Survival Rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Harrison, Lawrence ; Brennan, Murray F. ; Newman, Elliot ; Fortner, Joseph G. ; Picardo, Anthony ; Blumgart, Leslie H. ; Fong, Yuman. / Hepatic resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases : A fifteen-year experience with ninety-six patients. In: Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 121, No. 6. pp. 625-632.
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abstract = "Background. The role of liver resection for hepatic metastases from noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine (NCNN) cancers is unknown. This study examine, a large, single institutional experience of hepatic resection for NCNN metastases. Methods. Records of 96 patients who underwent liver resection for metastatic NCNN cancer from 1980 to 1995 at a single institution were reviewed. Survival after liver resection in this cohort of patients is reported, and factors predictive of survival are analyzed. Results. Resection was performed for liver metastases from genitourinary primary tumors (n = 34), soft tissue primary tumors (n = 41), and metastases from other primary cancers (n = 21). Extent of liver resection included wedge (n = 32), lobectomy (n = 44), and extended hepatic lobectomy (n = 20). No operative deaths occurred. Overall survival rate after resection at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80{\%}, 45{\%} and 37{\%}, respectively (median survival, 32 months), with 12 actual 5-year survivors. There was no difference in survival according to the type of liver resection bilateral versus unilateral disease, or resection of extrahepatic disease. Disease-free interval of less than 36 months before discovery of liver metastases, curative resection, and primary tumor group (genitourinary was greater than soft tissue, which was greater than gastrointestinal) were predictors of a significantly better survival by multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Primary tumor type, disease-free interval, and curative resection predict those patients who benefit from hepatic resection. Hepatic resection for patients with NCNN metastasis has value in carefully selected patients.",
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Hepatic resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases : A fifteen-year experience with ninety-six patients. / Harrison, Lawrence; Brennan, Murray F.; Newman, Elliot; Fortner, Joseph G.; Picardo, Anthony; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Fong, Yuman.

In: Surgery, Vol. 121, No. 6, 01.01.1997, p. 625-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hepatic resection for noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine metastases

T2 - A fifteen-year experience with ninety-six patients

AU - Harrison, Lawrence

AU - Brennan, Murray F.

AU - Newman, Elliot

AU - Fortner, Joseph G.

AU - Picardo, Anthony

AU - Blumgart, Leslie H.

AU - Fong, Yuman

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Y1 - 1997/1/1

N2 - Background. The role of liver resection for hepatic metastases from noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine (NCNN) cancers is unknown. This study examine, a large, single institutional experience of hepatic resection for NCNN metastases. Methods. Records of 96 patients who underwent liver resection for metastatic NCNN cancer from 1980 to 1995 at a single institution were reviewed. Survival after liver resection in this cohort of patients is reported, and factors predictive of survival are analyzed. Results. Resection was performed for liver metastases from genitourinary primary tumors (n = 34), soft tissue primary tumors (n = 41), and metastases from other primary cancers (n = 21). Extent of liver resection included wedge (n = 32), lobectomy (n = 44), and extended hepatic lobectomy (n = 20). No operative deaths occurred. Overall survival rate after resection at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80%, 45% and 37%, respectively (median survival, 32 months), with 12 actual 5-year survivors. There was no difference in survival according to the type of liver resection bilateral versus unilateral disease, or resection of extrahepatic disease. Disease-free interval of less than 36 months before discovery of liver metastases, curative resection, and primary tumor group (genitourinary was greater than soft tissue, which was greater than gastrointestinal) were predictors of a significantly better survival by multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Primary tumor type, disease-free interval, and curative resection predict those patients who benefit from hepatic resection. Hepatic resection for patients with NCNN metastasis has value in carefully selected patients.

AB - Background. The role of liver resection for hepatic metastases from noncolorectal, nonneuroendocrine (NCNN) cancers is unknown. This study examine, a large, single institutional experience of hepatic resection for NCNN metastases. Methods. Records of 96 patients who underwent liver resection for metastatic NCNN cancer from 1980 to 1995 at a single institution were reviewed. Survival after liver resection in this cohort of patients is reported, and factors predictive of survival are analyzed. Results. Resection was performed for liver metastases from genitourinary primary tumors (n = 34), soft tissue primary tumors (n = 41), and metastases from other primary cancers (n = 21). Extent of liver resection included wedge (n = 32), lobectomy (n = 44), and extended hepatic lobectomy (n = 20). No operative deaths occurred. Overall survival rate after resection at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80%, 45% and 37%, respectively (median survival, 32 months), with 12 actual 5-year survivors. There was no difference in survival according to the type of liver resection bilateral versus unilateral disease, or resection of extrahepatic disease. Disease-free interval of less than 36 months before discovery of liver metastases, curative resection, and primary tumor group (genitourinary was greater than soft tissue, which was greater than gastrointestinal) were predictors of a significantly better survival by multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Primary tumor type, disease-free interval, and curative resection predict those patients who benefit from hepatic resection. Hepatic resection for patients with NCNN metastasis has value in carefully selected patients.

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