Follow-up postoperative calls to reduce common postoperative complaints among urogynecology patients

Christopher Iwanoff, Maria Giannopoulos, Charbel Salamon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: The purpose of our study was to identify the most common reasons why postoperative urogynecology patients called their surgeon within the first 6 weeks of surgery. We hypothesize that implementing a follow-up postoperative call (FPC) policy would decrease the number of patient-initiated calls within this postoperative period. Methods: This is a prospective before-and-after cohort study that was conducted in two phases. The initial phase identified the most common reasons why patients call within 6 weeks of their inpatient or outpatient urogynecological surgery. In the second phase, an intervention was implemented where each postoperative patient was called within 48 to 72 h of discharge: the intervention group. The primary outcome was the number of phone calls initiated by patients during the 6-week postoperative period. Results: There were 226 patients in the control group and 233 patients in the intervention group. Significantly fewer calls were initiated by patients in the intervention group, both groups having a median of 1 call per person, range 0–8 in the control group and 0–10 in the intervention group (p = 0.04). The five most common complaints were as follows: pain (20.4%), medication management (17.4%), disability paperwork (15.5%), and laboratory results (11.5%). There was a significant reduction in calls concerning constipation, laboratory/pathology results, and disability insurance claims after implementing the FPC policy. Conclusions: The implementation of the FPC policy resulted in fewer patient-initiated calls. As such, there were significant reductions in postoperative complaints of constipation, vaginal bleeding, incomplete bladder emptying, and inquiries into laboratory results and disability paperwork.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Constipation
Postoperative Period
Disability Insurance
Control Groups
Uterine Hemorrhage
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Inpatients
Urinary Bladder
Cohort Studies
Pathology
Pain
Surgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

Cite this

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title = "Follow-up postoperative calls to reduce common postoperative complaints among urogynecology patients",
abstract = "Introduction and hypothesis: The purpose of our study was to identify the most common reasons why postoperative urogynecology patients called their surgeon within the first 6 weeks of surgery. We hypothesize that implementing a follow-up postoperative call (FPC) policy would decrease the number of patient-initiated calls within this postoperative period. Methods: This is a prospective before-and-after cohort study that was conducted in two phases. The initial phase identified the most common reasons why patients call within 6 weeks of their inpatient or outpatient urogynecological surgery. In the second phase, an intervention was implemented where each postoperative patient was called within 48 to 72 h of discharge: the intervention group. The primary outcome was the number of phone calls initiated by patients during the 6-week postoperative period. Results: There were 226 patients in the control group and 233 patients in the intervention group. Significantly fewer calls were initiated by patients in the intervention group, both groups having a median of 1 call per person, range 0–8 in the control group and 0–10 in the intervention group (p = 0.04). The five most common complaints were as follows: pain (20.4{\%}), medication management (17.4{\%}), disability paperwork (15.5{\%}), and laboratory results (11.5{\%}). There was a significant reduction in calls concerning constipation, laboratory/pathology results, and disability insurance claims after implementing the FPC policy. Conclusions: The implementation of the FPC policy resulted in fewer patient-initiated calls. As such, there were significant reductions in postoperative complaints of constipation, vaginal bleeding, incomplete bladder emptying, and inquiries into laboratory results and disability paperwork.",
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Follow-up postoperative calls to reduce common postoperative complaints among urogynecology patients. / Iwanoff, Christopher; Giannopoulos, Maria; Salamon, Charbel.

In: International Urogynecology Journal, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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