Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter

Robert F. Coyne, Megan Deely, Charles D. Gottlieb, Francis E. Marchlinski, David J. Callans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Although recent studies have demonstrated that the endpoint of isthmus conduction block is superior to that of termination and subsequent inability to induce atrial flutter (AFl), the optimal method for determining isthmus conduction block has not been determined. Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during coronary sinus (CS) pacing may provide a reliable endpoint for AFl ablation. Methods and Results: Catheter mapping and ablation was performed in 42 patients with isthmus-dependent AFl. The patients were divided into two groups, based on procedural endpoint: Group I (28 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined based on multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping, and Group II (14 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined by electroanatomic mapping during CS pacing alone. In Group I, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 25 of 28 patients (89 %). A 100 % concordance between the data presented by multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping was noted in determining the presence or absence of isthmus conduction block. In Group II, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 13 of 14 patients, 13 (93 %). After a mean of 16.3 ± 3.7 months follow up, there was 1 atrial flutter recurrence in the 38 patients (2.6 %) with demonstrated isthmus block at the end of the procedure. Conclusions: Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during CS pacing is comparable to the multipolar catheter mapping technique for assessing isthmus conduction block as an endpoint for AFl ablation procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number281592
Pages (from-to)635-643
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atrial Flutter
Coronary Sinus
Catheters
Catheter Ablation
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Coyne, Robert F. ; Deely, Megan ; Gottlieb, Charles D. ; Marchlinski, Francis E. ; Callans, David J. / Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter. In: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology. 2000 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 635-643.
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abstract = "Introduction: Although recent studies have demonstrated that the endpoint of isthmus conduction block is superior to that of termination and subsequent inability to induce atrial flutter (AFl), the optimal method for determining isthmus conduction block has not been determined. Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during coronary sinus (CS) pacing may provide a reliable endpoint for AFl ablation. Methods and Results: Catheter mapping and ablation was performed in 42 patients with isthmus-dependent AFl. The patients were divided into two groups, based on procedural endpoint: Group I (28 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined based on multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping, and Group II (14 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined by electroanatomic mapping during CS pacing alone. In Group I, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 25 of 28 patients (89 {\%}). A 100 {\%} concordance between the data presented by multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping was noted in determining the presence or absence of isthmus conduction block. In Group II, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 13 of 14 patients, 13 (93 {\%}). After a mean of 16.3 ± 3.7 months follow up, there was 1 atrial flutter recurrence in the 38 patients (2.6 {\%}) with demonstrated isthmus block at the end of the procedure. Conclusions: Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during CS pacing is comparable to the multipolar catheter mapping technique for assessing isthmus conduction block as an endpoint for AFl ablation procedures.",
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Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter. / Coyne, Robert F.; Deely, Megan; Gottlieb, Charles D.; Marchlinski, Francis E.; Callans, David J.

In: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 281592, 01.01.2000, p. 635-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter

AU - Coyne, Robert F.

AU - Deely, Megan

AU - Gottlieb, Charles D.

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AU - Callans, David J.

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N2 - Introduction: Although recent studies have demonstrated that the endpoint of isthmus conduction block is superior to that of termination and subsequent inability to induce atrial flutter (AFl), the optimal method for determining isthmus conduction block has not been determined. Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during coronary sinus (CS) pacing may provide a reliable endpoint for AFl ablation. Methods and Results: Catheter mapping and ablation was performed in 42 patients with isthmus-dependent AFl. The patients were divided into two groups, based on procedural endpoint: Group I (28 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined based on multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping, and Group II (14 patients)-isthmus conduction block was determined by electroanatomic mapping during CS pacing alone. In Group I, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 25 of 28 patients (89 %). A 100 % concordance between the data presented by multipolar catheter recordings and electroanatomic mapping was noted in determining the presence or absence of isthmus conduction block. In Group II, ablation procedures were acutely successful in 13 of 14 patients, 13 (93 %). After a mean of 16.3 ± 3.7 months follow up, there was 1 atrial flutter recurrence in the 38 patients (2.6 %) with demonstrated isthmus block at the end of the procedure. Conclusions: Electroanatomic magnetic mapping during CS pacing is comparable to the multipolar catheter mapping technique for assessing isthmus conduction block as an endpoint for AFl ablation procedures.

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