Early provision of oropharyngeal colostrum leads to sustained breast milk feedings in preterm infants

Ruth Snyder, Aimee Herdt, Nancy Mejias-Cepeda, John Ladino, Kathryn Crowley, Philip Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Oropharyngeal colostrum (OC) application strategies have been shown to be feasible and safe for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Evidence to support the nutritional and clinical advantages of OC care remains somewhat theoretical. The objectives of this study were to a) confirm the feasibility and safety of OC application in preterm infants and b) determine if OC application is associated with improved nutritional and clinical outcomes from birth to discharge. We hypothesized that OC application in the first few days would promote sustained breast milk feedings through discharge. Methods An observational longitudinal study was conducted in 133 VLBW infants during 2013–14, after an OC protocol was adopted. Maternal and infant characteristics, infant vital signs during administration, nutritional outcomes, and common neonatal morbidities were assessed and compared to 85 age- and weight-matched VLBW infants from a retrospective control cohort from 2012, prior to the implementation of the OC protocol. Results There were no adverse events or changes in vital signs during the application of OC. VLBW infants who received OC continued to receive the majority of their enteral feeds from human breast milk at six 6 of age and through discharge (p < 0.01). There was no difference in maternal characteristics known to affect breast milk production, and rates of common neonatal morbidities were statistically similar between groups. Conclusion OC application for VLBW infants is safe and practical in a neonatal intensive care unit setting and is associated with increased rates of breast milk feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-540
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics and Neonatology
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Colostrum
Human Milk
Breast Feeding
Premature Infants
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Vital Signs
Mothers
Morbidity
Nutritional Support
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Small Intestine
Observational Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Parturition
Safety
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Snyder, Ruth ; Herdt, Aimee ; Mejias-Cepeda, Nancy ; Ladino, John ; Crowley, Kathryn ; Levy, Philip. / Early provision of oropharyngeal colostrum leads to sustained breast milk feedings in preterm infants. In: Pediatrics and Neonatology. 2017 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 534-540.
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Early provision of oropharyngeal colostrum leads to sustained breast milk feedings in preterm infants. / Snyder, Ruth; Herdt, Aimee; Mejias-Cepeda, Nancy; Ladino, John; Crowley, Kathryn; Levy, Philip.

In: Pediatrics and Neonatology, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.12.2017, p. 534-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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