Early natural history of regional left ventricular dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction

Douglas L. Mann, Rodney A. Foale, Linda Gillam, David Schoenfeld, John Newell, Arthur E. Weyman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Existing studies provide conflicting information concerning the natural history of regional dysfunction after subacute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative computer-assisted two-dimensional echocardiography to define the natural history of abnormal wall motion in a subacute canine infarct model within individual short-axis echocardiographic planes, and in the entire ventricle as well. Serial short-axis echocardiograms were obtained from 10 closed-chest dogs before occlusion and at 0.5, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after ligation of the circumflex (six dogs) or left anterior descending (four dogs) coronary artery. The circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion was quantified by two different computer-assisted methods: the first, a derived correlation method, examined wall motion throughout the systolic contraction sequence; the second method examined the fractional radial change in endocardial ray length from end-diastole to end-systole. The study shows that for individual planes there is a slight but not statistically significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion from 0.5 to 72 hours after coronary artery occlusion; however, when the total extent of left ventricular asynergy was used to define a global functional infarct size, we observed a small (3.6% to 5.4%) but significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-546
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume115
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Myocardial Infarction
Dogs
Natural History
Coronary Vessels
Diastole
Systole
Coronary Occlusion
Ligation
Echocardiography
Canidae
Thorax

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Mann, Douglas L. ; Foale, Rodney A. ; Gillam, Linda ; Schoenfeld, David ; Newell, John ; Weyman, Arthur E. / Early natural history of regional left ventricular dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction. In: American Heart Journal. 1988 ; Vol. 115, No. 3. pp. 538-546.
@article{750d62b87f96480491ef1ec6b6a2f508,
title = "Early natural history of regional left ventricular dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction",
abstract = "Existing studies provide conflicting information concerning the natural history of regional dysfunction after subacute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative computer-assisted two-dimensional echocardiography to define the natural history of abnormal wall motion in a subacute canine infarct model within individual short-axis echocardiographic planes, and in the entire ventricle as well. Serial short-axis echocardiograms were obtained from 10 closed-chest dogs before occlusion and at 0.5, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after ligation of the circumflex (six dogs) or left anterior descending (four dogs) coronary artery. The circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion was quantified by two different computer-assisted methods: the first, a derived correlation method, examined wall motion throughout the systolic contraction sequence; the second method examined the fractional radial change in endocardial ray length from end-diastole to end-systole. The study shows that for individual planes there is a slight but not statistically significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion from 0.5 to 72 hours after coronary artery occlusion; however, when the total extent of left ventricular asynergy was used to define a global functional infarct size, we observed a small (3.6{\%} to 5.4{\%}) but significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion.",
author = "Mann, {Douglas L.} and Foale, {Rodney A.} and Linda Gillam and David Schoenfeld and John Newell and Weyman, {Arthur E.}",
year = "1988",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0002-8703(88)90801-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "115",
pages = "538--546",
journal = "American Heart Journal",
issn = "0002-8703",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Early natural history of regional left ventricular dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction. / Mann, Douglas L.; Foale, Rodney A.; Gillam, Linda; Schoenfeld, David; Newell, John; Weyman, Arthur E.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 115, No. 3, 01.01.1988, p. 538-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early natural history of regional left ventricular dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction

AU - Mann, Douglas L.

AU - Foale, Rodney A.

AU - Gillam, Linda

AU - Schoenfeld, David

AU - Newell, John

AU - Weyman, Arthur E.

PY - 1988/1/1

Y1 - 1988/1/1

N2 - Existing studies provide conflicting information concerning the natural history of regional dysfunction after subacute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative computer-assisted two-dimensional echocardiography to define the natural history of abnormal wall motion in a subacute canine infarct model within individual short-axis echocardiographic planes, and in the entire ventricle as well. Serial short-axis echocardiograms were obtained from 10 closed-chest dogs before occlusion and at 0.5, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after ligation of the circumflex (six dogs) or left anterior descending (four dogs) coronary artery. The circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion was quantified by two different computer-assisted methods: the first, a derived correlation method, examined wall motion throughout the systolic contraction sequence; the second method examined the fractional radial change in endocardial ray length from end-diastole to end-systole. The study shows that for individual planes there is a slight but not statistically significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion from 0.5 to 72 hours after coronary artery occlusion; however, when the total extent of left ventricular asynergy was used to define a global functional infarct size, we observed a small (3.6% to 5.4%) but significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion.

AB - Existing studies provide conflicting information concerning the natural history of regional dysfunction after subacute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative computer-assisted two-dimensional echocardiography to define the natural history of abnormal wall motion in a subacute canine infarct model within individual short-axis echocardiographic planes, and in the entire ventricle as well. Serial short-axis echocardiograms were obtained from 10 closed-chest dogs before occlusion and at 0.5, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after ligation of the circumflex (six dogs) or left anterior descending (four dogs) coronary artery. The circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion was quantified by two different computer-assisted methods: the first, a derived correlation method, examined wall motion throughout the systolic contraction sequence; the second method examined the fractional radial change in endocardial ray length from end-diastole to end-systole. The study shows that for individual planes there is a slight but not statistically significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion from 0.5 to 72 hours after coronary artery occlusion; however, when the total extent of left ventricular asynergy was used to define a global functional infarct size, we observed a small (3.6% to 5.4%) but significant increase in the circumferential extent of abnormal wall motion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023874603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023874603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0002-8703(88)90801-0

DO - 10.1016/0002-8703(88)90801-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 3278575

AN - SCOPUS:0023874603

VL - 115

SP - 538

EP - 546

JO - American Heart Journal

JF - American Heart Journal

SN - 0002-8703

IS - 3

ER -